repatriate

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Repatriation

The act of an individual or company bringing foreign capital into a home country and converting it to the domestic currency. Generally speaking, an individual who repatriates capital is usually converting foreign earnings into his/her home country's currency, perhaps in the process of moving back to the home country after having a job abroad. A company that repatriates capital is usually bringing over the returns on foreign investment. Repatriation can expose the individual or company to foreign exchange risk.

repatriate

To bring home assets that are currently held in a foreign country. Domestic corporations are frequently taxed on the profits that they repatriate, a factor inducing the firms to leave overseas the profits earned there.
References in periodicals archive ?
The town of Carterton, near Brize Norton, is to continue the tradition with the creation of a purpose-built repatriation centre.
UNHCR states that involuntary repatriation "would in practice amount to refoulement.
35) When UNHCR determines that such a change has occurred, UNHCR implements large-scale voluntary repatriation programs.
In contrast, the 1951 Refugee Convention allows host states to determine an end to refugee status and mandate repatriation.
It remains unclear whether the degree of change required to facilitate voluntary repatriation and to mandate repatriation are the same.
This paper begins with the investigation of the historical/ theoretical voluntary repatriation framework, which asserts that refugees should only repatriate to their country of origin on a voluntary basis when the socio-political and ethnic situation that instigated their problem comes to an end.
The UNHCR asserted that both refugee agencies and academic analysts commonly utilize the following concepts: asylum flow, mass expulsion, ethnic cleansing, disaster-induced displacement, development-induced displacement, forced migration, internal displacement, population transfer, population exchange, involuntary repatriation, and imposed return.
Therefore, it is impossible to clearly comprehend the dynamics and magnitude of the present resettlement issues without articulating the historical/ contemporary context of resettlement and voluntary and forced repatriation theories.
Clearly, however, Cuban authorities singled out the Haitian community for forced repatriation.
Unlike Haitian braceros (laborers), most legal Jamaican immigrants had complied with their colony's Emigrants Protection Laws, and were thus eligible for repatriation at their government's expense.
56) Without the firm backing of organized labor, Haitian immigrants stood alone against the repatriation effort which soon followed.
The last repatriation to the town took place on August 18, when the body of Lieutenant Daniel Clack, 24, of 1st Battalion The Rifles, was brought back to the UK.