repatriate

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Repatriation

The act of an individual or company bringing foreign capital into a home country and converting it to the domestic currency. Generally speaking, an individual who repatriates capital is usually converting foreign earnings into his/her home country's currency, perhaps in the process of moving back to the home country after having a job abroad. A company that repatriates capital is usually bringing over the returns on foreign investment. Repatriation can expose the individual or company to foreign exchange risk.

repatriate

To bring home assets that are currently held in a foreign country. Domestic corporations are frequently taxed on the profits that they repatriate, a factor inducing the firms to leave overseas the profits earned there.
References in periodicals archive ?
While these may be seen as the province of larger, globalised firms, they should be prominent components of HRM processes for organisations dealing with repatriates.
Most organisations recognise the need to support repatriates, particularly in the areas of financial and career counseling, and in the provision of family-orientated strategies (Black, 1992; Klaff, 2002; Swaak, 1997).
Policies should provide guidelines to ensure that all repatriates are fairly treated whilst working away from the company base.
Interviews of repatriates, IHRM experts, a literature search, and a consideration of organisational culture and values can all assist in the development of the policy.
The construction and promotion of a repatriation policy assists in affirming the company's commitment to repatriates.
What they do not anticipate, however, is the out-of-sight, out-of-mind syndrome, a frequently observed phenomenon in which repatriates return to organizations that appear to have forgotten who they are, do not know what they accomplished during their overseas assignment, and do not know how to use their international knowledge appropriately As a result, many returnees find their careers have been in a holding pattern and that others have been promoted ahead of them.
Repatriates tend to judge their reentry position primarily on the basis of whether or not their original expectation was matched--not on the economic circumstances facing the company, especially when the assignment had caused considerable family disruption.
The job adjustment problem is further exacerbated when, also contrary to expectations, repatriates receive jobs with less authority, responsibility, and autonomy than they were used to in the foreign assignment.
The resulting role conflict can be a source of frustration to both repatriates and their home organizations.
For repatriates and their family members, who often think their experience is somewhat unique, just knowing what kinds of problems to expect is a useful beginning.
O Gi Wan, a former high-ranking North Korean official, could hardly believe his eyes on December 16, 1959, when he watched as 975 Koreans began to disembark in the sleet at Chongjin port from the first ship from Japan to repatriate them.
Baldoz said that of the 2,736 OFW repatriates assisted, an overwhelming 2,027 are active members of the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration, while 615 are not.