rent

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Rent

Regular payments to an owner for the use of some leased property.

Rent

A regular, usually monthly, payment that a person makes in exchange for the use of an asset he/she does not own. That is, rent is the payment on a lease. The term is most often used to refer to payments on a leased dwelling or other piece of real estate.

rent

the periodic payments made to the owners of ASSETS (for example, household and industrial premises, car hire) for the use of these assets. See LEASE, LEASING, LEASEBACK, INCOME.

rent

the periodic payments made to the owners of ASSETS for the use of their land or other assets as either FACTORS OF PRODUCTION or for consumption. In aggregate terms, rents are a source of income and they are included as a part of NATIONAL INCOME. See also ECONOMIC RENT, NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS.

rent

Payment for the privilege of possessing space one does not own.
References in periodicals archive ?
First it examines how owners became landlords renting out their farm in order to weather family crises and hold their patrimony together for the succeeding generation.
Colbert's reasons for renting the property at rates below FMV were never discussed.
I tell owners that renting an apartment is like lending your car to a total stranger.
Although the actual guidelines rent increase of 2 percent for a one-year lease and 4 percent for a two-year lease are the lowest in 25 years, a vacancy allowance of 10 percent can also be collected for leases beginning that date for those units renting for less than $400, while a 5 percent vacancy allowance can be collected for apartments renting up to $999.
The most important thing is that prices are going up for studios, one- and two - bedrooms," explained Packes, "so people who could buy are renting, except for the largest category.
99; and nothing for apartments renting for more than that.
Among the exceptions concerns the vacant apartment renting for less than $2,000 prior to October 1, 1993, but improvements are made to the apartment which, when added to the prior rent via the 1/40th-of-cost factor would have driven the rent (had the apartment been rented) to $2,000 or more as of October 1, 1993; that rent will be deemed to meet the $2,000 threshold.
Weisz believes apartments renting for $1,000 should not be protected.
The normal rationales for buying an apartment do not apply for those tenants who are renting one way below market rates.