ratio

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Ratio

The division of one piece of financial information by another. Financial ratios are very common in fundamental analysis, which investigates the financial health of companies. An example of a financial ratio is the price-earnings ratio, which divides a publicly-traded company's share price by its earnings per share. This and other ratios help analysts determine whether a company's share price properly reflects its performance.

ratio

The relation between two quantities when compared mathematically with one another. For example, the most frequently used ratio among investors is the price-earnings ratio. Financial analysts, investors, and managers use ratios to evaluate many factors such as the attractiveness of a stock or the operating efficiency of a company. Also called financial ratio. See also activity ratio, debt management ratio, liquidity ratio, profitability ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because relative risk ratios can be difficult to interpret, we follow the recommendation of Hosmer and Lemeshow (26) and calculate predicted probabilities from the models containing both school connectedness variables and the full set of control variables.
The relative risk ratios related to screening decisions for each SF-36 scale were calculated, and the scores with the highest relative risks were physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality, mental health, social functioning, and general health.
While cancer mortality is lower for Arabs than for Jews, age adjusted rates for cancer incid ence show that the Relative Risk Ratio of Jews as compared to Arabs is much higher than the Relative Risk Ratio for cancer mortality.
The overall relative risk ratio for developing an adverse reaction was 4.