regulation

(redirected from regulatory)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to regulatory: Regulatory law, Regulatory Agencies

Regulation

The set of rules and legislation governing certain actions. For example, the U.S. Tax Code and the rules the IRS publishes regulate federal taxation in the United States. In securities, regulations often require companies to disclose their actions to see to it that as much information as possible is publicly available. Other regulations govern business practices; for example they may set minimum or maximum wages and salaries, prohibit discrimination on certain grounds, and/or ban certain policies or practices deemed unfair for consumers or competitors. While nearly everyone agrees that some regulations are necessary, there is significant disagreement as to how many and what kind. Proponents of more regulation state that it ensures a fair market place and sustainable growth, while critics argue that many regulations do more harm than good.

regulation

the control of economic activities by the government or some other regulatory body, for example an industry trade association. Regulation can include PRICE CONTROLS to regulate inflation; FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROLS to regulate currency flows; and COMPETITION POLICY to regulate the operation of particular markets. More specific regulation may be imposed upon individual industries or activities, for example price control of denationalized industries (e.g. Oftel, which regulates telecommunication prices and Of gas which regulates gas prices in the UK); and the regulation of financial services by the BANK OF ENGLAND and the FINANCIAL SERVICES AUTHORITY. See DEREGULATION, RATE OF RETURN REGULATION.

regulation

the control of economic activities by the government or some other regulatory body, for example, an industry trade association. Regulation can include PRICE CONTROLS to regulate inflation, FOREIGN EXCHANGE CONTROLS to regulate currency flows, and COMPETITION POLICY to regulate the operation of particular markets. More specific regulation may be imposed upon individual industries or activities, for example, price control of privately owned PUBLIC UTILITIES (for example, Oftel, which regulates telecommunication prices in the UK), and the regulation of financial services by the BANK OF ENGLAND and the FINANCIAL SERVICES AUTHORITY.

There is a danger that regulators appointed to serve the interests of customers will instead serve the interests of the regulated firms (a so-called situation of‘regulatory capture’). This is particularly likely to occur when appointed regulators work with specific managers in regulated firms for a long time and are influenced by the public relations and lobbying activities of firms.

See DEREGULATION.

References in periodicals archive ?
Federal regulation of insurance is not a new concept to the insurance industry and is currently being considered as an alternative to our current state -based regulatory system.
For many years, regulatory compliance processes have been largely manual, but the complexity and sheer size of the problem makes this approach unsustainable.
Geneticist Svante Paabo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, regards the new study as the first convincing demonstration of a regulatory gene influencing human evolution.
In 1983, after 20 years of learning how to induce regulatory sclerosis from the inside, Tozzi set up a consulting shop--Multinational Business Services--to do it from the outside.
Since then, the EMC Celerra has become the primary storage device for the company's unstructured data--such as user home directories, engineering CAD/CAM files, critical business documents, and regulatory information.
4) The focus of the reform has been on strengthening the regulatory capital framework for large, internationally active banking organizations through minimum capital requirements that are more sensitive to an institution's risk profile and that reinforce incentives for strong risk management.
This was recognized as a convergence of industry and regulatory agency positions regarding the scope of QSAR use and an acceptance that both positive and negative assignment of a chemical can be achieved with (Q)SAR models.
FPL alleged that it intended to expense the items; it used the regulatory method only as a "starting point" and intended to make adjustments to increase deductible repair expenses for tax purposes when it became aware of the erroneous capitalization.
Dan Quayle, to take up the regulatory reform banner through a "Council on Competitiveness.
Industry lost the battle and regulatory reform has become a political football," said the minutes, taken by an American Petroleum Institute consultant, Arnold Moore.