Regionalism

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Regionalism

In political science, the ideology that seeks to decentralize government, or at least promote the interests of a given set of groups. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
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Strong similarities exist among the works of other prominent Regionalist artists, although each developed his own unique style.
Kollin resists such emphasis on regionalist major works as unduly restrictive and exclusionist.
Regionalists, their homemade art galleries, ironic picnics, theatre workshops, their gladsome business.
On one side are localists and on the other, regionalists.
Indeed, by 1929, Pound was publishing in a most unexpected venue, a left-wing southwestern regionalist periodical, the Morada, published out of Albuquerque, New Mexico by the young Norman Macleod.
These constructions were designed to appeal to regionalists, ruralists, and others outraged by the "crimes of modern architecture," whose equal portions of air, cement, ultra-violet rays, running water, and food allegedly produced "egalitarian and nudist" cubicles devoid of local color, charm, and character (Hubert-Fillay 1937, 2-3).
It was the museum that influenced Jim Vogel, eventually leading to Vogel's becoming an artist in the same New Mexico regionalist style that he so often saw as a child.
The leading Regionalist artists were Thomas Hart Bention, Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry.
Because Zitkala-Sa is writing about a way of life that has survived rapid change, she interprets identity, geography, and everyday reality in response to such change, a form of textual, cultural, and psychological work which explicitly works against the universalizing tendencies of dominant ideologies and which white regionalists do not undertake in their texts.
Groups like the Mercian Movement, Wessex Regionalists and Devolve
Historians of the American West have tended to be either regionalists or scholars of the frontier.
Unlike Woods, and aligned with her perception of the local color writers themselves, Apthorp sees the regionalists as relocating rather than losing their faith in feminine virtues and their spatial representations of them.