Regionalism

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Regionalism

In political science, the ideology that seeks to decentralize government, or at least promote the interests of a given set of groups. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
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In 2008, Zachary Michael Jack published The Plowman Sings: The Essential Fiction, Poetry, and Drama of America's Forgotten Regionalist Jay G.
Regionalists stress the values of distributive fairness and effectiveness, which is defined in terms of metropolitan regions' global competitiveness.
While his emphasis on the role of Poetry, the Little Review, and the Dial in the genesis of modern poetry is familiar, when exploring the "present" of 1930, Pound crossed into some largely unfamiliar territory: a little magazine from Mississippi, Charles Henri Ford's Blues, and a poetry magazine, Palms, edited in Guadalajara, Mexico, by a protege of regionalist poet Witter Bynner.
More problematic were discussions among the regionalists within the pages of Jean Charles-Brun's Action regionaliste concerning whether the Exposition's Rural and Regional Centers could ever be more than "regional masquerades.
Carter accepted a regionalist perspective that argued that issues in Africa are unique to the region and should be evaluated accordingly.
Historically speaking, then, Welzer's animus towards socialism is not derived from the regionalist movement itself.
In a windup statement, the western New Yorkers described themselves as "budding regionalists.
To judge from the writings of most of the German regionalists of the late 1920s, the trauma of the Great War and the democratic experiment of the Weimar Republic had, if anything, strengthened and solidified the reactionary elements inherent in the movement.
McVicker, and many regionalists such as John Farnsworth, Alan Frakes, Mark Gould, Phil Epp, Mary Wielage, Don Pearson and Murv Jacob and Native American artists such as Fred Beaver, Woody Crumbo, Mirac Creepingbear.
Thomas Hart Benton was the leader of a group of painters during the 1930s who went by the name of Regionalists.
In this desolate, otherworldly tabula rasa, creative endeavour is endowed with a new and highly charged context, a crucial sp ur to an emerging generation of Southwestern regionalists, among them Will Bruder, Wendell Burnette and Rick Joy.
Why should the West Midlands, the regionalists argue, which has a larger population than Scotland or Wales, continue to be penalised for being part of England?