Regionalism

(redirected from regionalisms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Regionalism

In political science, the ideology that seeks to decentralize government, or at least promote the interests of a given set of groups. Regionalism may advance geographic areas and/or ethnic groups. Despite growing international trade, regionalism is fairly popular in many countries. See also: Federalism.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In his hands, and particularly in AWR, he approaches the exploration of comparative regionalism from a diversity of analytical perspectives, and his claim that sparse theoretical approaches are wanting seems convincing.
We agree that the future of Asian regionalism is certainly open in this regard.
9) As Katzenstein himself points out, Asian regionalism is centered on "a convergence of interests in the provision of some collective goods" (1997, 23).
Since the end of World War II, there have been at least two major waves of regionalism.
First-wave scholarship on regionalism was excessively concerned with measuring the level of integration and its significance for the future of the nation-state system, as well as the extent to which regional integration was being fostered by positive functional spillovers.
9) As regionalism (again defined as the conscious activities of states to coordinate their activities across borders) declined, so too did both empirical and normative study of regionalism.
Russell's treatment of inter-textual connections in The Cure at Troy is also enlightening and serves to exemplify how Heaney's regionalism opens doors to global and universal contexts beyond the inherited locale.
Throughout these chapters and much of Seamus Heaney's Regions the interpretive and theoretical "lever" of regionalism enables the author to gain substantial critical purchase on his subject's imaginative project.
Migrant Imaginings and the Atlantic Canadian Regionalisms.
This is a study of regionalism, nationalism, and identity in a city divided between an imagined Albertan conservatism, a displaced Newfoundland outport, and a cosmopolitan global work-force.
The old regionalism and the new regionalism are different in the following ways:
The old regionalism was created in the bipolar world of cold-war, but the new regionalism is being created in a multi-polar world order.