redundancy

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redundancy

the termination of an individual's employment when the employer ceases trading or the job ceases to be required because of rationalization, change of product etc. When an employer decides to make part or all of a workforce redundant the European Collective Redundancies Directive requires that the workforce be consulted on the extent, distribution and rationale for redundancy. Advance notice must be given with the extent of this dictated by the number of planned redundancies. Consultation must take place with union representatives, specially elected employee representatives where a TRADE UNION is not present, or (exceptionally) directly with all employees.

Employees with more than two years' service are statutorily entitled to a redundancy or severance payment. For adult employees under 40 this is one week's pay for each year of service, for those of 40 plus it is one and a half week's pay for each year up to a maximum of twenty years. Many employers choose to make payments substantially above the statutory level (in some public sector organizations there are special schemes to support this) to sweeten the pill of redundancy.

Selection of employees for redundancy can be a traumatic process and, if the organization is to continue trading, needs to be conducted fairly if the morale of those remaining is not to be irretrievably dented. A favoured option is to seek voluntary recruits for redundancy among older employees, backed up by generous redundancy payments and possibly early access to pension benefits. An alternative method is ‘last-in-first-out’ (LIFO),i.e. those with shorter service are selected for redundancy. Whilst superficially fair the problem with this is that it potentially removes those young workers who have most to offer the organization in the long term.

Whatever the method chosen, redundancy is undoubtedly a distressing process for all those involved. Some more progressive organizations offer counselling services to aid adjustment and to rebuild confidence. Others, especially where very large numbers have been made redundant, have set up employment agencies in an attempt to find alternative work. Although trade unions sometimes declare their intention to fight redundancies, they and their members are generally unwilling to take any form of industrial action since this could imperil redundancy payments. Unions, therefore, usually come to devote their efforts to ensuring that individuals are treated fairly by those handling the redundancy process.

redundancy

the loss of jobs by employees, brought about by company RATIONALIZATION and reorganization that results from falling demand or PRODUCTIVITY improvement. In the UK, adult employees under 40 years of age are entitled to redundancy or severance payment of one week's pay for each year of service, and for those over 40, it is one and a half week's pay for each year up to a maximum of 20 years. See UNEMPLOYMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
But this means identifying the non-blind game as redundance, or symmetry: conversely, symmetry may be a factor limiting the information content, such as, for instance, in the case of a homogeneous sequence made up of the monotonous repetition of a single symbol and which is characterised by the maximum symmetry, but certainly not by the maximum intelligence and creativity.
to serve the main ideas, showing the grammatical relationships, carrying standards of social acceptability, modifying, qualifying, parenthesizing, and providing useful redundance.
To overcome this redundance in the data set, Mousseau and Roff (1987) used median values to perform some of their analyses.
The cash flow information during the year of offering is excluded to avoid the redundance problem in the testing procedure.
The graceful curving path that counterbalances economy of the vertical against a redundance of stalling angles is the periodic path of least effort and most time.
As is usual when several independent authors are used to construct a coherent book on a broad topic, some redundance appears, but a student using the book should find this more helpful than otherwise.
The redundance is linked to the stability in a sustainable level of output and the price of fish.
Yet these briefly stated conditions are peculiar in their own right, in two different respects: first, in the appearance of the women as lessors for the labor of brothers-in law; second, in the appearance of divine emblems, the crowns of Samas and Marduk, in three distinct senses: 1) in the crowns' situation as witnesses stricto sensu, rather than as objects upon which oaths were sworn or testimony delivered; 2) in the apparent legal and theological redundance of Samas and his crown appearing simultaneously; 3) in that the crowns are said to belong to the ward (babtum)--and specifically to the ward of the wives (babtisina).
This technology completely used fly ash and bottom ash characteristic and all negative influence on mining production are eliminated (like instability of disposal material, redundance of water used like transport medium and pollute water and air).
I think we have latterly had a redundance of these national benefits, & therefore I give you all credit for your matronly behavior" (BLJ II.
Predbezny odhad entropie a redundance psane cestiny" [A preliminary estimate of the entropy and redundancy of written Czech].