agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
Use of ascorbic acid as reducing agent for synthesis of well-defined polymers by ARGET ATRP.
a) Internal calibration Plasma PBS TCEP as reducing agent QC low-pool 6.
7 Major Enterprises of Polycarboxylate Water Reducing Agent in China
500 pmol) were injected into the microreaction purge vessel containing 5 mL of reducing agent solution, and the quantity of produced NO was measured after conversion by each reducing agent at 20 [degrees]C for N[O.
The use of economically non-recyclable plastic scrap as a reducing agent for the steel industry eliminates landfilling of end-of-life plastics, reduces coal mining, lowers greenhouse gas emissions and drives higher recovery rates of recyclable plastics for conversion back into finished products.
Another variation is the acid perm, a two-part product containing an alkali which is mixed with a low pH reducing agent immediately before applying to the hair.
OTC: CBIA), has confirmed the efficacy of its oncology candidate, CB1400, as a tumor reducing agent and has also demonstrated the synergistic effect of this drug in combination with both cisplatin and cetuximab (Erbitux) in two mice lung cancer models.
0M and less than or equal to the maximum solubility of the zinc source in water; a complexing agent for the zinc source, the complexing agent was selected from a nitrogen-containing compound or a phosphorus-containing compound; and a reducing agent.
The process utilizes Bruggemann's Bruggolite([R])FF6 M reducing agent during the post-polymerization process to remove residual monomers from emulsions containing Hexion's VeoVa[TM] vinyl ester monomer.
NEW YORK, July 9, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- North America Sodium Reducing Agent Market: By Type (Amino Acids, Mineral Salts, Yeast Extracts, Others), By Application (Dairy & Frozen Foods, Bakery & Confectionery, Meat Products, Sauces, Seasonings, & Snacks, Others) - Forecasts till 2019
The composition, which contains a surfactant, an oxidizing agent and reducing agent, is provided as a dispersion or suspension of a particulate component in a liquid carrier.
The consequent investments into restructuring the production processes, developmental work to find the appropriate reducing agent, as well as the regular purchasing of reducing agent will add significantly to the internal costs of producers," comments Frost & Sullivan's Research Analyst Evelyn Turmes.