Tide

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Tide

In technical analysis, an informal term for a security's performance over a long period of time, usually over a year or more. Analysts look for cyclical behavior in a security to interpret the tide properly; that is, if a long-term bull market is observed with a bad trading day in a certain week, an analyst might view the short-term trend as moderately bearish without detracting from the long-term bullish tide. The term was coined by Robert Rhea. See also: Ripple, Wave.
References in periodicals archive ?
Red tide, said Noaa, is caused by "microscopic algae that produce toxins that kill fish and make shellfish dangerous to eat.
Duration or longest recent red tide outbreak, 2003-2005
According to the research on the prediction of red tide, there are already many prediction methods, such as empirical prediction method, statistical prediction method, numerical model prediction method, and artificial neural network [13-15].
The rescuers released the manatees into the wild after the red tide cleared.
SOA said it will use satellite remote-sensing technology, patrol vessels and helicopters to monitor any changes in the red tide.
Red tide refers to about 60 potentially deadly oceanic biotoxins.
An official at the Federal Electricity and Water Authority's (Fewa) Ajman branch, said the main tank that stores desalinated water was shut down on April 25 due to red tide -- the brownish or reddish coloration of water caused by toxic algae bloom first seen two weeks ago.
I believe, this time, there was considerable impact left by the red tide.
Florida red tide is caused by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces toxins called brevetoxins and is most commonly found in the Gulf of Mexico; however, K.
At its peak, the 2005 red tide covered more than 67,000 square kilometers of shallow coastal waters--an area larger than the state of West Virginia.
Red tide (Alexandrium fundyense) on the Cape and north as far as Isle au Haut in Maine played havoc with many of these filter feeders in 2005.
Like humans, fish and wildlife are suffering from both man-made pollutants like lead, mercury and arsenic, and natural toxins like red tide.