recording

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recording

Entering something into the real estate or probate records so that it serves as constructive notice of its contents to all the world. Many jurisdictions have specialized requirements before they will admit documents to recording, such as the name and address of the person who prepared the document, the book and page numbers of the source of title for the property,and prohibitions against strike-through marks or other editorial revisions apparent on the face of the document. See the sample recording information.

References in classic literature ?
Prying further into the manuscript, I found the record of other doings and sufferings of this singular woman, for most of which the reader is referred to the story entitled "THE SCARLET LETTER"; and it should be borne carefully in mind that the main facts of that story are authorized and authenticated by the document of Mr.
Well, then," said Gertrude, afraid to press the point, but determined not to record first, "let Jane Carpenter begin.
And so now, up to this very hour, all the records we have are complete and in order.
When I glance over my notes and records of the Sherlock Holmes cases between the years '82 and '90, I am faced by so many which present strange and interesting features that it is no easy matter to know which to choose and which to leave.
Is it a millionaire from the other side, trying to make records, or a member of our bloated aristocracy?
My Dutch letters are simply records of the balances at my different banks, mere financial details.
However that may be, it is of record that on recovering from his illness John May was indicted for the murder of his missing father.
Immediately this musty record of man's land lust assumes the formidableness of a battle--the quick struggling with the dust.
Undoubtedly she was executed by the Mercenaries; and, as is well known, no record of such executions was kept by the Iron Heel.
Sometimes, especially at the beginning, the record is very scant.
The explanation lies, as I believe, in the extreme imperfection of the geological record.
This may perhaps be allowed true with regard to poetry, but it may be thought impracticable to extend it to the historian; for he is obliged to record matters as he finds them, though they may be of so extraordinary a nature as will require no small degree of historical faith to swallow them.