Reappraisal

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Reappraisal

An estimation of the value of a property, conducted by a person licensed to do so after an appraisal was previously conducted. Reappraisals are conducted periodically, for example, for property tax purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
to stir up new debate on civic humanism among scholars of the Italian Renaissance, to take stock of where recent research has brought us, and to press further along the various paths of exploration and reappraisal that have opened up in the last two decades" (7-8).
Reappraisals were higher in southern and western Montana where population was increasing, and lower in eastern Montana where population was decreasing.
The reappearance of nearly all of his fiction in the recent past," the editors write, "suggests we are very close to a major reappraisal of Chester Himes, and this collection will help in that process.
As the never-ending reappraisal of northwest Arkansas real estate continues, some residents are pleased with the results.
NYSE: TYL) has signed an agreement with Fairfield County, Ohio, to provide real property appraisal services for the county's 2013 general reassessment, per its sexennial reappraisal cycle.
New appraisals and reappraisals of the history of art are very much in the forefront of current scholarly research.
EDUCATORS AND county officials around Arkansas are becoming more versed in the three R's of school funding: real estate, reappraisals and revenues.
However, Golding's art-historical essays are less dispirited; though dense, they are continually relieved by funny anecdotes, fresh reappraisals, and a sense of living involvement with the art of the past.
Taxable assessed values (TAV) have grown by a strong compound annual average of over 12% since fiscal 2000, including a 16% increase in fiscal 2007 due to equal amounts of reappraisals and new construction.
Property owners are advised to call Hahn's office as soon as possible to request reappraisals.
For those unacquainted with Thevet's work and career, Schlesinger provides an introduction detailing the cosmographer's life and writings, as well as an excellent short summary of Thevet's stormy "fortune" among scholars, from the traditional castigation of his work to the recent reappraisals found in Lestringant, Whatley and others.