Ratable

(redirected from rateable)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

Ratable

1. Describing a property of which an appraisal is possible. For example, a farm is a ratable property because its value is able to be assessed.

2. See: Taxable.
References in periodicals archive ?
The latest revaluation period came into effect on April 1, 2010, with rateable values based on a valuation date of April 1, 2008.
In future, ratepayers of vacant commercial premises undergoing refurbishment should not assume their assessments will be reduced to a nominal rateable value, which may well deter investors from upgrading stock.
And it could be good news for businesses as they may receive the welcome news that their rateable values have either remained static or have decreased.
Many of the proposed rateable values show uplifts from the previous assessments and the Valuation Office invites occupiers to advise them of any errors or issues relating to the summary valuation.
Post offices with a rateable value of between pounds 9,000 and pounds 11,999 will receive 50 per cent relief.
This can be quite unfair, particularly where the Rateable Value Assessments, which reflect open market rental value, have fallen and where the occupier's liability is phased downwards incrementally.
The VOA values properties for the purposes of charging business rates and assign the rateable values every five years, and the current revaluation values properties based on their rental values at April 1, 2008.
It gives 50pc relief to those with a rateable value up to pounds 5,000 and relief on a sliding scale to businesses with a rateable value between pounds 5,000 and pounds 10,000.
Sue Essex: The average increase in rateable values in Wales between 1998 and 2003 was 12.
New rateable values will apply to business properties from Friday, April 1, and there have been a number of cases, some of which have ended in court, of businesses being targeted by rating cowboys.
The 2005 business rates revaluation looks set to compound the problem, with high increases in rateable values (from which the overall rates bill is derived) for retailers.