radon


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radon

Colorless, odorless gas that occurs naturally due to the breakdown of minerals in the earth. It tends to become trapped in our modern, nearly air-tight homes. Since there has been some correlation between radon and lung cancer, the EPA recommends levels no higher than 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), although generally acceptable levels are in the range of 4 to 8 pCi/L. The EPA Web site at www.epa.gov has information on testing for radon and reducing it.

References in periodicals archive ?
Specialists in radon gas testing and radon remediation can help mitigate the danger to those living in the home.
Prerequisites for testing include having knowledge of radon, incentive to test, and the financial means to perform the test and mitigate for radon if necessary.
For this reason we advise all householders to test their homes for radon and, if high levels are found, to have their houses fixed.
Normally, emission of radon from the earth crust into the atmosphere is in infinitesimal amount.
Radon is gaseous in its uncombined form, and it is a natural radioactive, colorless, odorless, and tasteless inert gas.
There can always be some risk, which can be reduced by lowering the radon level in your home.
In August 2011, following a pilot project conducted in 65 schools located in three priority investigation areas in Quebec, (15) the Ministry of Education mandated the 72 school board administrators of the province to measure radon in all their schools by the year 2014.
Exposure to radon causes an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths annually.
It is even more difficult to make the case that radon trends correlate with hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, if one considers the true arrival date of significant high-volume fracking in all but Washington County, Pennsylvania.
While organizations like Workplace Safety North have measured radon levels in mines in the past, and found ventilation systems adequately dispersed the radon, Mahoney said to his knowledge no thorough testing has been done.
In order to better understand what radon is and how radon can cause lung cancer, you first need to understand what an atom is and what the numbers on the periodic table represents.