Guatemalan Quetzal

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Guatemalan Quetzal

The currency of Guatemala. It was introduced in 1925 and was pegged to the U.S. dollar and the French franc, as well as gold, at different points in its history. Since 1987, it has been a floating currency. It is named after the quetzal, a local bird whose feathers were used as a currency during the Mayan period.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, the twenty-one women of Mercedes have paid 4,842 quetzales (about $783) in loan payments, 519 quetzales (about $84) in interest, and 383 quetzales ($62) to the internal account.
Promoters can make 1,000 to 1,500 quetzales ($167-250) monthly, as much or even somewhat more than a Guatemalan schoolteacher earns.
Jesus Rodriguez, has provided economic aid (25 quetzales or U.
When my administration began, the municipal fee charged by Distribuidora Electrica de Occidente (DEOCSA) was between 26 quetzales and 27 quetzales (US$3.
Cesar de Leon, a community leader from the municipality of San Rafael Pie de la Cuesta who has encouraged locals to suspend payments, justifies such actions claiming it is "extremely unfair to expect people who live in extreme poverty and live in a shack with two light bulbs to pay 90 quetzales [US$11.
Donald Gonzalez, spokesman for the Policia Nacional Civil (PNC), says that people hire gang members to commit a murder for as little as 100 quetzales (US$12.
After a number of stolen items were found in the women's home, including 7,000 quetzales (US$840) and the deeds of a property, the thieves were beaten, paraded across the town, and taken to the main square where they were doused with gasoline.
The special troops can earn up to 1,800 quetzales monthly (about US$234) while serving with the state.
The machinations that diverted the taxpayers' quetzales to the other parties involved setting up a civil-society front organization, Amigos en Accion, to transfer funds through contracting for the preparation of reports.
The multitude was motivated by a promise from their leader, Rosenda Perez, that the government would give them a down payment of 5,000 quetzales (about US$650) on its commitment to pay them 20,000 quetzales each (see NotiCen, 2002-08-22).
The protestors demanded payment of 20,000 quetzales each (about US$2,600) for services rendered to the state, but which were not compensable in the peace accords.