Stop

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Stop

1. An order to a broker to buy or sell a security at the best available price once a certain, stated price is reached. Suppose that price is $50. A stop order remains inactive until that security begins trading at $50, at which point the broker may fill the order at best price he/she is able to find. See also: Stop-limit order, Stop-loss order.

2. An order by the SEC to stop a new issue from taking place because of an omission or inaccuracy on its filing statement. See also: Deficiency letter.
References in periodicals archive ?
But as a way of resolving a dispute, consulting a few books on punctuation is certainly quicker than delving into the intent of the parties.
All the punctuation and grammar is shifted to her stress, pause and voice modulation.
Rachel Brannan, member of the NAHT national executive forTeesside, said: "The teaching of grammar, spelling and punctuation is vital.
Probably the main way in which teachers help pupils to improve their grammar and punctuation is to identify the areas they are struggling with and select an activity to target that area of weakness.
The Punctuation Show delivers its message in three key ways.
The punctuation sets the tone of the message; if you write it in the first or the third person amplifies whatever that effect was," McAndrew told Live Science.
I thought it was a clever and funny idea, because at that time I didn't think of punctuation as a subject.
Editor's note: Air Force publications, including Airman magazine, follow Associated Press Stylebook guidelines on grammar, punctuation and usage.
Now, I did have a sort of vague idea that my punctuation might not be faultless.
When you see the newest punctuation mark for sarcasm, you'll know the writer of that sentence doesn't literally mean what they're writing; they're being sarcastic," the company said in a release.
Much has been written on the punctuation practice of late sixteenth- and seventeenth-century English writers in order to work out the ultimate function of marks of punctuation.