data processing

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data processing

the organization and processing of information in a business. The use of COMPUTERS to store data (see DATA STORAGE) and to undertake routine data processing activities such as recording purchases, sales, payroll etc. can save time, improve recording accuracy and reduce staffing costs. See INFORMATION MANAGEMENT, LOCAL AREA NETWORK.
References in periodicals archive ?
With punch cards you sometimes don't punch hard enough where you're supposed to punch, or punch twice when you meant to punch once.
If any of us had bothered to research the subject thoroughly prior to November 7, 2000, we would have known that questions about the accuracy of punch card balloting had been around since the technology was introduced in the 1960's.
Florida sought to solve its punch card problem with new electronic voting systems--a very expensive solution that, as voters discovered in the primary election, comes with a new set of problems.
When Steve Young began his business nearly 40 years ago, he specialized in collecting computer punch cards (or "tap cards") from offices throughout the Los Angeles area.
However, the company that preceded IBM set the world on fire decades ago by making computer punch cards.
The result is akin to a nanotech version of the venerable data processing 'punch card' developed more than 110 years ago, but with two crucial differences: the 'Millipede' technology is re-writeable (meaning it can be used over and over again), and may be able to store more than 3 billion bits of data in the space occupied by just one hole in a standard punch card.
The federal class-action lawsuit claims the state's punch card system violates 14th Amendment Equal Protection rights and the U.
In both, a metal-tipped stylus is placed through a circular hole in a clear molded polycarbonate sheet over a position on a punch card ballot, presumably corresponding to the voter's choice, driven through a partially incised rectangle in the card, carrying this effluvium, the "chad," through a slot formed by strips of rubber lying directly beneath the punch card.
Also, many ballots had dimpled chads--little squares that did not fall out of the punch card when voters chose a candidate.
The projecting end is randomly studded with tiny square openings, like a computer punch card.
This November, for example, Virginia's counties will use five different kinds of ballots (optical, punch card, electronic, paper, lever machines).