Public

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Related to publicity: public relations, sales promotion

Public

1. Describing anything available to the population at large. For example, a publicly-traded company may be owned and traded by anyone with the money to buy shares.

2. Describing anything owned or administered by a government. For example, a municipality owns and maintains a public park.
References in classic literature ?
But after all he is half justified; publicity is the lawful right of every man; consequently, Burdovsky is not excepted.
Publicity is a noble, beneficent, and universal right.
For Tchebaroff had already menaced me with publicity in our interview.
He himself towers up in the doorway, a big figure with a mouth--an eloquent cavity beneath a vast black moustache--distorted by his shout to these relentless agents of publicity.
After so many years and the publicity given the case by a curious and shameless press; now that Monsieur Stangerson knows all and has forgiven all, all may be told.
But when we pass on to bodily sensations--headache, toothache, hunger, thirst, the feeling of fatigue, and so on--we get quite away from publicity, into a region where other people can tell us what they feel, but we cannot directly observe their feeling.
The whole distinction of privacy and publicity, however, so long as we confine ourselves to sensations, is one of degree, not of kind.
The majority of the younger men envied him for just what was the most irksome factor in his love--the exalted position of Karenin, and the consequent publicity of their connection in society.
I will tell you how to deal with Brott, and the publicity, after all, will be nothing.
Monkeys as aids to publicity have, I believe, been tested and found valuable by other artistes.
Thousands of people were wildly staring about for somebody alive to heap reproaches on; and this notable case, courting publicity, set the living somebody so much wanted, on a scaffold.
Tulliver's blond face seemed aged ten years by the last thirty hours; the poor woman's mind had been busy divining when her favorite things were being knocked down by the terrible hammer; her heart had been fluttering at the thought that first one thing and then another had gone to be identified as hers in the hateful publicity of the Golden Lion; and all the while she had to sit and make no sign of this inward agitation.