Fixation

(redirected from psychoanalysis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to psychoanalysis: Humanistic psychology, behaviorism, Sigmund Freud

Fixation

The process of setting a price of a commodity, whether in the present or the future. See: Gold fixing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ernest Jones became, without doubt, the major voice of psychoanalysis for the next forty years.
Mitchell and Black (1995) have pointed out four myths surrounding psychoanalysis that have led to confusion and misleading understandings.
examination of the ideological ferment from which psychoanalysis arose
This generalized concern with boundaries, with the psychic other, prompts the question: what use is psychoanalysis in relation to the problem of social and historical otherness?
Criticisms of the use and relatedness of history and psychoanalysis are also raised in the first section of this book.
I am arguing for a historicisation of psychoanalysis which examines the historical and social conditions which made possible both its methods and its objects of study, an engagement with key issues in the heated debate which still rages about its validity.
This brings me to another important point, one having to do with the place of psychoanalysis and philosophy in the text, one that is also related to a particularly distinctive argumentative style in this book, and one that I find disappointingly uncompelling.
This edited collection looks at educational through the lens of psychoanalysis and vice versa.
Exposure to analytic experience does not necessarily ensure a better grasp of psychoanalysis but it would allow me to expect from the ethnographer who uses psychoanalysis a better understanding of the reality of the human psyche.
Rejecting the notion that homosexuality is a perversion, Lesbianism and Psychoanalysis represents a bold step forward for psychoanalysis.
not only draws on psychoanalytic and theological resources but also integrates concepts from the wide range of scholarly fields, his study will appeal to those who are interested in Freudian psychoanalysis and developmental psychology, as well as to students of contemporary hermeneutics and the history of theology.
The contributors look at healthcare as a whole and deal with specific areas of health, such as midwifery, psychoanalysis, naturopathy, the relations between medicine and the state, and the appeal of "quacks.