I

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I

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that it is the third preferred bond of the company.

I

1. On a stock transaction table, a symbol indicating that a dividend was paid after a stock split.

2. A symbol appearing next to a bond listed on NASDAQ indicating that the bond is a company's third preferred bond. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if the letter "I" follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded is a third preferred bond.

i

Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables to indicate that the dividend was paid after a stock dividend or split: Lehigh s.20i.
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Global Prostate Cancer - Hormonal Therapy Drugs Sales & Forecast to 2020
is examining whether melatonin supplements can fight prostate cancer.
Preliminary results from three Phase 1 clinical trials show that OGX-011 is well tolerated, achieves excellent drug concentrations in prostate tissue, and produces a 91 percent dose-dependent down-regulation of clusterin in prostate cancer cells removed from prostate cancer patients.
2002) in order to help define the role of arsenic in prostate cancer progression.
Grier, 72, has served on the Prostate Cancer Foundation's board of directors since 1993.
In studies of thousands of men, the risk of prostate cancer is 70 percent higher in those who consume more alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA--an omega-3 fat found in meat, vegetable oils, and other foods.
The development of the PSA test (prostate specific antigen) revolutionized prostate cancer screening.
The study evaluated the use of PROSTASCINT fusion imaging to define brachytherapy treatment regimens for 239 newly-diagnosed prostate cancer patients.
Analysis of licensing agreements during 2004-2010 in the prostate cancer therapeutics market.
According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer in men, with more than 220,000 new cases and nearly 30,000 deaths in the United States in 2003.
Unnecessary treatment for prostate cancer means more than inflated expenses and needless suffering and anxiety for men and their families.
Terry, a sports chiropractor in Westlake Village, organized the first Hap Weyman Memorial Prostate Cancer Climb in 2001.