property

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property

see ASSET.

property

Any tangible or intangible thing that is or may be owned by someone.

References in periodicals archive ?
Jobless, propertyless, cold, hungry, and virtually shoeless, social problems compounded for them.
Delegates "wished to disfranchise most of the Negroes and the uneducated and propertyless whites in order to legally create a conservative electorate," wrote historian Malcolm McMillan.
As Leo Marx notes in The Machine in the Garden, "Associated with what seemed a world-wide surge of the poor and propertyless, with democratic egalitarianism, the machine is used to figure an unprecedented release of human energy in science, politics, and everyday life" (191).
of a wage-earning propertyless class as "sores on the body politic.
If autobiographies are narratives of lost pasts -- of hopes that had failed to materialize and needs left unmet -- in Smedley's and Steedman's working-class accounts this sense of loss is magnified by the experience of a robbed present, the predicament of "the propertyless and the dispossessed" (Landscape, p.
We now have in the voter pool propertyless, immature 18-year-olds and dependence-minded women, not to mention sizable numbers of hastily naturalized immigrants, most of them unacquainted with the demands of liberty.
This level of employment will not be reached, if society is divided into two classes, one of which is constituted by the owners of the land, the other one by propertyless labour.
New York Times, April 24, 1994) As I noted earlier, apartheid also effectively rendered most Black South African landless and propertyless.
Part III Representation and Reception: Womens suffrage drama, Katharine Cockin; A propertyless theatre for the propertyless class, Tom Thomas; Modern dance in the Third Reich: six positions and a coda, Susan A.
Probably not by being Peter the Propertyless Proletarian because there are, in fact, many, many employers willing to bid for any individual's labor.
Namely, that he neglects the implications that follow from his insufficient attention to the propertyless.
A separation of classes into rich and poor begins; propertyless workers drive down wages; and, for the first time, a quasi-capitalistic mode of production emerges; armies of beggars, social unrest, and revolts culminating in the peasant wars are the result.