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Related to profits: Accounting Profits

Profit

Revenue minus cost. The amount one makes on a transaction.

Profit

A company's total revenue less its operating expenses, interest paid, depreciation, and taxes. For example, suppose a widget manufacturer earns $1,000,000 in total revenue. The widgets cost $200,000 to make and his administrative and payroll expenses total $250,000. He also must subtract $50,000 in depreciation on his widget manufacturing equipment and pay $200,000 in taxes. His net income is stated as: $1,000,000 - $200,000 - $250,000 - $50,000 - $200,000 = $300,000.

profit

Profit.

Profit, which is also called net income or earnings, is the money a business has left after it pays its operating expenses, taxes, and other current bills.

When you invest, profit is the amount you make when you sell an asset for a higher price than you paid for it. For example, if you buy a stock at $20 a share and sell it at $30 a share, your profit is $10 a share minus sales commission and capital gains tax if any.

profit

the difference that arises when a firm's SALES REVENUE is greater than its total COSTS. GROSS PROFIT is the difference between SALES REVENUE and the COST OF SALES, while NET PROFIT is equal to gross profit less selling distribution, administration and financing costs. PROFIT AFTER TAX is the net profit attributable to shareholders after taxes have been paid.

Profit depends on two main factors:

  1. average profit margins or profit per £1 of sales. If costs increase the profit margins will be squeezed; if competition forces selling prices downward margins will be similarly squeezed, and vice versa;
  2. sales turnover. Any increase in sales value will tend to increase profits. See PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT.

profit

the difference that arises when a firm's TOTAL REVENUE is greater than its TOTAL COSTS. This definition of‘economic profit’ differs from that used conventionally by businessmen (accountingprofit) in that accounting profit takes into account only explicit costs. Economic profit can be viewed in terms of:
  1. the return accruing to enterprise owners (entrepreneurs) after the payment of all EXPLICIT COSTS (payments such as wages to outside factor-input suppliers) and all IMPLICIT COSTS (payments for the use of factor inputs - capital, labour - supplied by the owners themselves);
  2. a residual return to the owner(s) of a firm (an individual ENTREPRENEUR or group of SHAREHOLDERS) for providing capital and for risk-bearing;
  3. the ‘reward’ to entrepreneurs for organizing productive activity, for innovating new products, etc., and for risk taking;
  4. the prime mover of a PRIVATE ENTERPRISE ECONOMY serving to allocate resources between competing end uses in line with consumer demands;
  5. in aggregate terms, a source of income and thus included as part of NATIONAL INCOME. See also PROFIT MAXIMIZATION, NORMAL PROFIT, ABOVE-NORMAL PROFIT, RISK AND UNCERTAINTY, NATIONAL INCOME ACCOUNTS.
References in classic literature ?
When you squeezed out the three small groceries here in Berkeley by virtue of your superior combination, you swelled out your chest, talked about efficiency and enterprise, and sent your wife to Europe on the profits you had gained by eating up the three small groceries.
You don't say that you like to squeeze profits out of others, and that you are making all the row because others are squeezing your profits out of you.
When he says "free opportunity for all," he means free opportunity to squeeze profits, which freedom of opportunity is now denied him by the great trusts.
It is true that we smaller capitalists are after profits, and that the trusts are taking our profits away from us.
Do not forget," he said, "that we had tacitly agreed that liberty in your case, gentlemen, means liberty to squeeze profits out of others.
While you diligently pursued that favorite phantom of yours, called profits, and moralized about that favorite fetich of yours, called competition, even greater and more direful things have been accomplished by combination.
It could sell still at a slight profit when we were selling at actual loss.
Companies with reduced profit growth during the recession now anticipate 22 percent topline growth, compared with the 34 percent expected by those companies whose growth in profits survived the recession intact.
Nasdaq: WRLD), a Zacks #1 Rank (Strong Buy) company, delivered annual profits that were 16% higher the year-prior.
The Zacks #1 Rank (Strong Buy) company produced annual profits last year that were 178% higher than the year-prior.