principal

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Principal

(1) The total amount of money being borrowed or lent. (2) The party affected by agent decisions in a principal-agent relationship.

Principal

1. A person or organization party to a transaction or event.

2. The amount that one borrows. For example, if one borrows $100,000, the principal amount is $100,000. Interest is calculated over the principal (and often over unpaid interest that accumulates).

principal

1. The face amount of a bond. Once a bond has been issued, it may sell at more or less than its principal amount, depending upon changes in interest rates and the riskiness of the security. At maturity, however, the bond will be redeemed for its principal amount. Also called principal amount.
2. Funds put up by an investor.
3. The person who owns or takes delivery of an asset in a trade. For example, an investor is the principal for whom a broker executes a trade.

Principal.

Principal can refer to an amount of money you invest, the face amount of a bond, or the balance you owe on a debt, distinct from the finance charges you pay to borrow.

A principal is also a person for whom a broker carries out a trade, or a person who executes a trade on his or her own behalf.

principal

  1. a sum of money or capital which can earn INTEREST.
  2. the owner of a firm or other assets who assigns the management of the firm or assets to an AGENT who acts on behalf of the principal. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY, AGENCY COST.

principal

  1. a sum of money or capital that can earn INTEREST.
  2. the owner of a firm or other assets who assigns the management of the firm or assets to an AGENT who acts on behalf of the principal. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY, AGENCY COST.

principal

(1) One who has permitted or instructed another—called an agent—to act on his or her behalf and according to his or her instructions. (2) One who is primarily liable for an obligation, as opposed to a surety,who is secondarily liable.(3) With a promissory note,the principal is the unpaid balance of the funds borrowed,not including any interest or other fees.(4) In a trust,the property of the trust that generates income.Principal can be real property or personal property.

Principal

The portion of the monthly payment that is used to reduce the loan balance.

See Amortization.

References in periodicals archive ?
Her upcoming book, Jim Crow's Pink Slip: Public Policy and the Near Decimation of Black Educational Leadership After Brown, will examine the cultural and social implications of educational policy as it relates to race equity and the principalship.
processes which affect nation states and produce policy mediation, which in turn have a direct impact on the management and principalship of educational institutions" (p.
Socialization to a new conception of the principalship.
School leaders emerged, largely unsolicited, from a cadre of dedicated teachers and embraced the principalship more as a vocation than a job.
The movement toward greater accountability in public education has caused the principalship to go through yet another period of redefinition, this time as a way to transform the role into one that is defined by political leadership.
His first principalship, from 2000 to 2002, was at O'Hara Catholic School in Eugene.
Yucca has some unique needs as a school, and we did hold principal interviews and although we found many good candidates suitable for the principalship, we didn't find a candidate that would be a good match for Yucca School,'' Gallizzi said.
Principalship of St Brigid's drove him away from hurling management but the offers still streamed in.
Renowned educator Shawn Joseph shows principals at all stages of their careers, school leaders of all types, and anyone interested in the principalship what can be done during this critical time period to build momentum and lay the foundation for a strong instructional program from July to June.
She had transferred to her current school as a temporary teacher when she married and, despite discouragement, had applied for and achieved the principalship in her first year.
We need the best and the brightest to run our schools, but in many ways, the typical principalship is not designed to attract or keep creative, entrepreneurial leaders.
One result of the two conferences was the commissioning of a research study for fact finding about the state of the principalship (Schuttloffel, 2003b).