Gift

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Gift

An asset of any kind that an individual transfers to another individual while neither receiving nor expecting anything in return. A gift one receives is taxable in the United States, but only if its value exceeds $13,000 (in 2009) and is not specifically excluded. For example, gifts between spouses are not taxable under any circumstances. See also: Estate, Gift Tax.

Gift

A transfer of property from one person or entity to another without consideration or compensation. For income tax purposes, the words "gift" and "contribution" usually have separate meanings, the latter word being used in connection with contributions to charitable, religious, etc., organizations, whereas the word "gift" refers to transfers of money or property to individuals.
References in classic literature ?
Often, however, an author introduces a Secondary Action merely for the sake of variety or to increase the breadth of his picture--in order to present a whole section of society instead of one narrow stratum or group.
Footnote: All these matters, here merely suggested, are fully discussed in the present author's 'Principles of Composition and Literature.
Some of them will concern us later, but for the present it is the fundamental character of mnemic phenomena that is in question.
Concerning the nature of an engram, Semon confesses that at present it is impossible to say more than that it must consist in some material alteration in the body of the organism ("Die mnemischen Empfindungen," p.
I am inclined to think that, in the present state of physiology, the introduction of the engram does not serve to simplify the account of mnemic phenomena.
What we observe is that certain present stimuli lead us to recollect certain occurrences, but that at times when we are not recollecting them, there is nothing discoverable in our minds that could be called memory of them.
Whenever the effect resulting from a stimulus to an organism differs according to the past history of the organism, without our being able actually to detect any relevant difference in its present structure, we will speak of "mnemic causation," provided we can discover laws embodying the influence of the past.
These cases of relationship, without identity, of the inhabitants of seas now disjoined, and likewise of the past and present inhabitants of the temperate lands of North America and Europe, are inexplicable on the theory of creation.
In the Cordillera of Equatorial South America, glaciers once extended far below their present level.
On this view of the whole world, or at least of broad longitudinal belts, having been simultaneously colder from pole to pole, much light can be thrown on the present distribution of identical and allied species.
The tropical plants probably suffered much extinction; how much no one can say; perhaps formerly the tropics supported as many species as we see at the present day crowded together at the Cape of Good Hope, and in parts of temperate Australia.
Just in the same manner as we see at the present day, that very many European productions cover the ground in La Plata, and in a lesser degree in Australia, and have to a certain extent beaten the natives; whereas extremely few southern forms have become naturalised in any part of Europe, though hides, wool, and other objects likely to carry seeds have been largely imported into Europe during the last two or three centuries from La Plata, and during the last thirty or forty years from Australia.