PREG

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Related to pregnancy: pregnancy test

PREG

Financial ratio defined as stock price divided by sales over earnings growth. Often used in the valuation of Internet stocks. Related: PSSG.

Price-Earnings Growth Ratio

A ratio of a stock's price to its increase in earnings over a given period of time. This is used in place of the price-earnings ratio in situations where the company has poor earnings that are gradually increasing. That is, PREG is most useful when the raw data on earnings may not show the company's fundamental strength or potential profitability. It is used often for dot-coms and other companies that may have poor earnings in their first few years of operation.
References in periodicals archive ?
If there's no placental tissue in the uterus, treat for ectopic pregnancy.
The primary outcome was uncomplicated pregnancy defined as a "normotensive pregnancy, delivered at more than 37 weeks resulting in a live born baby who was not small for gestational age and did not have any other significant pregnancy complications.
A proportion of women undergo a TVS, and still the location of the pregnancy cannot be identified.
Major Finding: Pregnancy-associated breast cancer is associated with a 46% increased risk of death and a 59% greater relapse risk than breast cancer unrelated to pregnancy.
Between 1995 and 2008, pregnancy rates declined by 17% in both developed regions (from 108 to 90 per 1,000) and developing areas (from 173 to 143).
Weakness, dizziness, or fainting can occur when the ectopic pregnancy has started bleeding inside.
If a woman had pre-eclampsia in her second pregnancy only, then her risk is 15% for her third pregnancy.
The case reported here demonstrates the occurrence of a rare form of abdominal pregnancy--an omental pregnancy which was primarily implanted on the gastrocolic ligament.
In 1995, the Institute of Medicine report The Best Intentions: Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families (1) focused national attention on unintended pregnancy and provided additional support to Washington State's efforts to expand access to family planning.
The Th2 response during pregnancy results in vigorous antibody-mediated immunity to pathogens (2).
Sixty-seven percent of women with live births had at least one ultrasound during their pregnancy in 2003 compared to 48 percent in 1989.
These findings are eye-opening, suggesting that elevated cortisol levels in early pregnancy [pose] a nearly complete threat to the pregnancy continuing," says endocrinologist David H.