Binding Authority

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Related to precedent: Stare decisis, set a precedent, Legal precedent

Binding Authority

A precedent decided by a higher court. Lower courts are required to follow binding authority when deciding similar cases. For example, precedents decided by the U.S. Supreme Court are binding authority on all American courts.
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Precedent is renowned as a leader in building brand awareness through digital marketing.
Worse, correcting a mistake like this in copy-paste precedent is at once less and more difficult than correcting one that is published.
As stated above, precedent is an obvious starting point for discussing how an originalist Congress should evaluate legislation.
subsequently, a precedent emerges out of the majority opinion of a case.
The risk that certain conditions will be treated as conditions precedent can produce harsh results--and the decision in Aspen seems to be one of them.
And we could give countless other examples that proceed identically to Retired Public Employees' Association and show that federal district court judges are often called upon to apply and interpret Supreme Court precedent.
The study of use of precedent offers a valuable tool for analyzing judicial decisionmaking.
However, the court recast the obligation as being subject to a condition precedent, stating that the obligation under the note "would not arise unless and until [Karns] materially breached" the supply agreement.
According to Supreme Court precedent, public schools are places where all students of various faiths and none must feel welcome and that, therefore, school officials and faculty must not do anything that would give students, parents or the community the appearance of promoting religion.
Precedent is established when a judge makes a ruling or decision on a particular issue, in a particular case.
The Court had no authority in law, precedent, or the Constitution for this illegitimate exercise of raw judicial power.
Tabin believes Scalia's Raich opinion stems not from an animus against drugs but from excessive respect for judicial precedent, and the belief that it should not be overturned without an extremely compelling reason.