portfolio

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Portfolio

A collection of investments, real and/or financial.

Portfolio

The set of open positions held by an investor. For example, if an investor owns shares in AT&T, GM, and bonds in Disney, one collectively refers to these as the investor's portfolio. Rational economic actors are expected to seek the highest possible return at the lowest possible risk. They do this by creating diversified portfolios, which spread risk out among several investments. See also: Portfolio Management.

portfolio

A group of investments. The more diversified the investments in a portfolio, the more likely the investor is to earn the same return as the market. See also diversification.

Portfolio.

If you own more than one security, you have an investment portfolio.

You build your portfolio by buying additional stock, bonds, annuities, mutual funds, or other investments. Your goal is to increase the portfolio's value by selecting investments that you believe will go up in price.

According to modern portfolio theory, you can reduce your investment risk by creating a diversified portfolio that includes different asset classes and individual securities chosen from different segments, or subclasses, of those asset classes. That diversification is designed to take advantage of the potential for strong returns from at least some of the portfolio's investments in any economic climate.

portfolio

  1. a collection of FINANCIAL SECURITIES held by an investor. Typically an investor would want to hold a number of different financial securities to spread his risk, and would seek a mixture of them, some offering high short-term DIVIDEND payments with others offering long-term capital appreciation as their market prices rise. Investors can assemble their own portfolio of shares, or they can opt to buy into funds offered by UNIT TRUSTS, INVESTMENT TRUSTS and other INSTITUTIONAL INVESTORS. The latter medium enables investors to invest in a much wider range of shares than their own limited resources would otherwise permit since unit trusts etc ‘pool’ the savings of many thousands of investors. Unit trusts etc. typically offer a number of different types of funds to appeal to different groups of investors, for example, ‘growth funds’ which aim to achieve capital growth, and ‘income funds'which aim to secure high income returns to investors. Some funds are passively managed by fund operators who buy shares in companies comprising a selected share index, for example, the ‘Financial Times Stock Exchange (FTSE) – 100 Share Index (see TRACKER FUND), while other funds are actively managed by fund managers who buy and sell shares regularly in a wider range of companies in order to maximize growth or income returns. See PORTFOLIO THEORY, INVESTMENT, INDIVIDUAL SAVINGS ACCOUNT.
  2. a collection of products marketed by a firm. See PRODUCT RANGE, PRODUCT-MARKET MATRIX, BOSTON MATRIX.

portfolio

the collection of FINANCIAL SECURITIES such as shares and bonds held by an investor. Typically, an investor would want to hold a number of different financial securities to spread his or her RISK and would seek a mixture of financial securities, some offering high short-term DIVIDEND payments with others offering long-term capital appreciation as their market prices rise significantly Additionally, investors may plan to hold various financial securities that have a particular MATURITY STRUCTURE so that they can achieve a predetermined pattern of cash flows.

Investors can assemble their own portfolio of shares or they can opt to buy into funds offered by UNIT TRUSTS, INVESTMENT TRUSTS and other INSTITUTIONAL INVESTORS. The latter medium enables investors to invest in a much wider range of shares than their own limited resources would otherwise permit since unit trusts, etc., ‘pool’ the savings of many thousands of investors. Unit trusts, etc., typically offer a number of different types of funds to appeal to different groups of investors: for example, ‘growth funds’, which aim to achieve capital growth, and ‘income funds’, which aim to secure high income returns to investors. Some funds are passively managed by fund operators who buy shares in companies comprising a selected share index, for example, the ‘Financial Times Stock Exchange (FTSE) - 100 Share Index (see TRACKER FUND), while other funds are actively managed by fund managers who buy and sell shares regularly in a wider range of companies in order to maximize growth or income returns. See PORTFOLIO THEORY, INVESTMENT, FOREIGN INVESTMENT, INDIVIDUAL SAVINGS ACCOUNT (ISA).

portfolio

A group of investment assets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Firms seeking to broaden client relationships and increase revenue can meet both objectives by expanding fixed-income services to include laddered and other types of individual bond portfolios.
My purpose in this study of portfolios therefore is twofold: a) to explore the ways in which a two-year school-based Master's program influenced and shaped teachers' professional growth as self-reported through a review of the program's exit portfolio and b) to glean program features and curricular experiences that teachers identified as meaningful to their professional growth.
If the goal is simply to sort, stratify, and rank, portfolios add little if you already have test data," says Monty Neill, executive director of Fair Test, a Massachusetts-based organization that opposes standardized testing.
Unlike an exam, which acts as a single measure of one's achievements, a portfolio is an integration of numerous, different kinds of informational and accomplishment-oriented materials.
You've got to have patience - and get in on an IPO, of course,'' said Michael De Coux, whose portfolio doubled its value to finish at $200,838.
For example, foreign bonds are frequently added to portfolios because they provide a positive diversification for a U.
Modern portfolio theory would suggest that the answer is a resounding "yes.
The Vanguard Group of Investment Companies, headquartered in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, has net assets exceeding $127 billion and manages 82 investment portfolios owned by more than four million individual and institutional clients.
These findings further reinforce the incentive to transact portfolios rather than individual securities.
Active Portfolios provide Ameriprise financial advisors with a turnkey investment solution that allows them to spend more time working with clients on their unique Dream > Plan > Track(SM) approach to financial planning.
As a teaching tool, electronic portfolios have been used many different ways.
The new Portfolio -- the first no-load of its kind -- complements the Fund's existing Money Market and Insured Long-Term Portfolios.