Overweight

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Overweight

Usually refers to recommendation that leads an investor to increase their investment in a particular security or asset class. The increase is usually with respect to a benchmark. Suppose that U.S. equities compose 40% of the benchmark portfolio. If one thinks the U.S. will outperform, the investor may increase the exposure to U.S. equity to more than 40%.

Overweight

1. See: Market outperform.

2. See: Overperform.

3. Describing a portfolio where one security or industry has too much representation. For example, an overweight portfolio may be overexposed to the financial industry, which means if the financial industry suffers a downturn the portfolio will decline in value more than other similar portfolios. See also: Diversification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike her ancestor, Greta Garbo, known for her famous statement "I want to be left alone," Lisa Marie Garbo is encouraging others to join her on the path of size-acceptance for all plus-sized people.
Much of this response by traditional retailers has come about to counteract the growing influence and reach of online retailers, who have been much quicker and more proactive about offering plus-sized stylish clothing specifically cut to fit different shapes.
How almost half of respondents to our exclusive consumer research report purchasing plus-sized clothing within the past 12 months.
How targeting plus-sized consumers has become somewhat more acceptable, coinciding with a backlash against too-thin models and actresses.
Additionally, this report explores the direction in which the plus-sized clothing market is heading, and why we expect it to continue growing faster than the overall clothing market into 2011.
com/health-fitness/2009/10/these-bodies-are-beautiful-at-every-size) Glamour , writer Genevieve Field explained that models unable to fit into samples clothing (which usually ranges from sizes 0-4 but sometimes go up to size 6) are considered plus-sized.
It remains to be seen whether the Ralph Lauren's decision and the upsurge of plus-sized models will spark a trend in the fashion world or if the industry will continue to be just as weight obsessed as it's always been.