pluralism

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pluralism

a diffusion of power and interests in a society or ORGANIZATION, such that there is a plurality of interest groups. Those who subscribe to pluralism argue that there will inevitably be differences between individuals or groups in any complex social institution over, for instance, the distribution of rewards.

Pluralists claim that it is better to accept these differences than to suppress them, because once they are brought into the open it is possible to find mechanisms for resolving potential conflict to the benefit of all. In INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS the pluralist frame of reference is held by those who believe that the interests of management and workers will inevitably differ on occasions, for example over the size of an annual pay increase. They argue that it is better to accept that TRADE UNIONS are the legitimate expressions of employee interests rather than to refuse recognition on the grounds that employer-employee interests are identical. If the latter policy is adopted CONFLICT may break out without warning and with no acceptable means of resolving it. If, on the other hand, unions are recognized then management and unions can work together to devise procedures (for example GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES) that will prevent differences of interest from developing into open conflict and provide a means of resolving conflict if it should occur. See MANAGEMENT STYLE.

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In this essay, the major argument is that King was both a theologian and a pluralist par excellence.
In exploring this tension within liberalism, Levy examines the rise of what would become intermediate associations during the Middle Ages; the consolidation of absolute monarchies in the early modern period; the pluralist invocation of "ancient constitutions," safeguarding autonomous groups and inherited rights, to protect liberty from absolutism; and the resistance to that invocation, in favor of a mythical social contract, on the part of those who saw threats to liberty from decentralized authorities such as religions, guilds, and local aristocracies.
Levy offers the conftict br,tween rationalist and pluralist versions of liberalism as a lens through which to view current debates over "multiculturalism, religious freedom, freedom of associations, universities, and local governments," inviting us to see these not merely as an assortment of "discrete odd problems," but rather as the "deep and perennial problems" of the liberal tradition.
Having made the "paradigm shift," pluralists call upon other theologians to cross "a theological Rubicon.
After posing his critique, Hallett devotes the remainder of the chapter to possible reasons why pluralists have neglected to address the issue of individuation.
Pluralists do not deny the significance of state law and coercive power, of course, but they do try to identify places where state law does not penetrate or penetrates only partially, and where alternative forms of ordering persist to provide opportunities for resistance, contestation, and alternative vision.
Should pluralists press ahead with radical new approaches or should they slow down for the "people in the pews"?
66) By envisioning sovereignty as distributive or multiple, pluralists sought to guarantee the flourishing of diverse and valuable forms of identities, ways of life, experiences, and viewpoints.
Nevertheless, Holst abandons the very real progress educational pluralists and NSMs have gained.
So we may be approaching what some propose as time for yet another great paradigm shift--from an inclusive approach to a pluralist one.
In 1859, Fr Angelo Secchi, director of the observatory and a confirmed pluralist, observed markings on the surface of Mars which he described as canal), channels.
The pluralist view become the most widespread political philosophy in Western democracies in the second half of the 20th century.