stigma

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Related to pistil: tube nucleus

stigma

A negative impression of property because of real or perceived problems.The most common stigma is associated with property that has remained on the market for whatever time period is locally considered “too long.”Potential buyers usually think there must be some problem with the property that they might or might not be able to recognize and economically cure, so they avoid such properties.Another common stigma is a commercial property,usually with a restaurant tenant, that has experienced high turnover.The reason might be that the tenants had insufficient financial resources to survive until the break-even point, but the property soon acquires a stigma as a bad location for restaurants.To some extent,the stigma can become a self-fulfilling prophecy if the community fails to patronize any business at that location because of the stigma.Despite that,there are tremendous opportunities for investors who target stigmatized properties and can successfully overcome the bad reputation.

References in periodicals archive ?
It is accomplished by the application of either auxins or gibberellins to the pistils of flowers.
Herbivore consumption of pistils, ovaries, or ovules will have an immediate and direct effect on reproduction through female function (Zammit and Hood 1986, Schemske and Horvitz 1988, Wallace and O'Dowd 1989, Bertness and Shumway 1992, English-Loeb and Karban 1992, Pellmyr and Huth 1994).
This fact suggested that the buds of trees during the period from sepal formation to pistil initiation were affected by some stress factors and the progression of petal, stamen and pistil primordia had not been formed.
Aggregate fruits derive from a single flower that has numerous pistils.
When they open the bottom of the pistil, they will see the ovules inside.
Relationships of pollen size, pistil length and pollen tube growth rates in Rhododendron and their influence on hybridization.
The rate of pistil maturation significantly decreased, thus enhancing protandry (Table 5).
Botanical correctness If you don't know a pistil from a stamen, check out the newest edition of Botany for Gardeners (Timber Press, 2010; $20) by Brian Capon.
8 mm long, equaling to slightly exceeded by the pistil, anthers sagittate; stigma simple-erect; mature fruits and seeds unknown.
1985) and Kubitzki (1987), we consider cyperoid flowers to be derived from a typical trimerous, actinomorphic, diplostemonous, monocot flower with a superior syncarpous pistil (e.
2 : the upper part of the pistil of a flower which receives the pollen grains
complete--A flower that has the four floral organs: sepals, petals, stamen, and pistil.