Pirate

(redirected from pirates)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Pirate

1. A person who commits robbery at sea. Piracy is one of the world's oldest crimes and is a risk in international trade. Captured pirates generally are tried in military courts. A company may insure against injury or loss of goods due to piracy.

2. A person who engages in the act or practice of making illegal copies of copyrighted material. For example, printing copies of a book without the author's or publisher's permission may be piracy because neither receives any compensation for sales. Piracy is a major issue in online commerce. It is common, for instance, for a private user to upload a video to a website and even profit from views of that video without permission from or compensation to the copyright owners. The best way to prevent or prosecute this form of piracy remains a controversial issue.
References in classic literature ?
There was an easy, com- fortable path along the shore under the bluff, but it lacked the advantages of difficulty and danger so val- ued by a pirate.
You see a pirate don't have to do ANYTHING, Joe, when he's ashore, but a hermit HE has to be praying considerable, and then he don't have any fun, anyway, all by himself that way.
I'd a good deal rather be a pirate, now that I've tried it.
From time immemorial the black pirates of Barsoom have preyed upon the Holy Therns.
If we could but reach the ramparts we might find that the pirates somewhere had thinned the guarding forces and left a way open to us to the world without.
Turning, I saw a dozen black pirates dashing toward us from the melee.
As the pirates advanced, the quick eye of Starkey sighted Nibs disappearing through the wood, and at once his pistol flashed out.
The pirates disappeared among the trees, and in a moment their Captain and Smee were alone.
But the pirates at once were over the side, and by pushing and pulling on the flat-bottomed skiffs, we moved steadily along.
The full moon was partly obscured by high-flying clouds, but the pirates went their way with the familiarity born of long practice.
Virginia took a keen delight in watching the Malays and lascars at their work, telling von Horn that she had to draw upon her imagination but little to picture herself a captive upon a pirate ship--the half naked men, the gaudy headdress, the earrings, and the fierce countenances of many of the crew furnishing only too realistically the necessary savage setting.
Better kill a hundred friends, he thought, than be captured by a single pirate.