Body

(redirected from pineal gland)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to pineal gland: melatonin

Body

The main part of a document or advertisement. The body provides the most detailed information compared to other parts of a document. Especially in marketing, it is intended to elicit the desired response from the reader.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first, the self-reported sleep problems of individuals with retinitis pigmentosa were examined and, in the second, an attempt was made to determine if those who have a genetic mutation that causes their visual disorder but is also expressed in the pineal gland are more likely to experience sleep-related difficulties than those whose mutation is expressed only in the retina.
Luke's human research revealed: "By old age, the human pineal gland has readily accumulated fluoride and its fluoride/calcium ratio is higher than bone.
16), (17), (22) Shaped like a tiny pine cone (hence the name), the pineal gland is filled with nerve cells that respond to light or darkness (some biologists refer to the pineal as the "third eye" for this reason).
Mechanisms of control of reproductive physiology by the pineal gland and its hormones.
The pineal gland is a pea-sized structure located in the midline of the brain between the two thalami lying above the third ventricle outside the blood-brain barrier.
Diagnostic image (166): sudden death in a young woman: cyst of the pineal gland with a prominent cerebellar tonsillar herniation [in Dutch].
Physiologic calcifications of the pineal gland (Figure 2) are seen in approximately 40% of normal people by the age of 20 years (1) and appear compact, measuring <1 cm in diameter.
However, the exact role of pineal gland and its main secretory product, melatonin, in the process of glucose and insulin metabolism has not been determined yet.
Circadin gradually releases the hormone that prepares the body for sleep in a way that mimics the activity of the pineal gland.
My Gills are Clogged," by Grover Cleveland's Pineal Gland
The pineal gland produces melatonin, which in turn helps regulate the release of hormones such as estrogen and testosterone.
The pineal gland -- integral to setting the body's sleep and wake cycles -- may be involved in a broad range of bodily functions, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions.