piggyback loan

Piggyback Loan

A loan for a portion of the value of a home over and above the traditional mortgage. In general, one must have a 20% down payment to purchase a home and one finances the remaining 80%. A piggyback loan allows one to borrow at least a portion of the remaining 20% (though at a higher interest rate than the remainder of the mortgage). A piggyback loan is an alternative to private mortgage insurance. It may allow more people to purchase their own homes.

piggyback loan

A combination of a construction loan and a permanent loan commitment.

References in periodicals archive ?
In 2006, almost 30% of all New York City homebuyers taking out a first mortgage simultaneously took out a second lien, or piggyback loan.
In the case of younger boomers, a planner needs to help clients decide whether to take out a piggyback loan to avoid paying private mortgage insurance, according to Pearson.
If you have a piggyback loan, you are going to get hit, again, with a higher capital requirement at the bank and a higher interest rate.
In the other alternative, the Piggyback loan, the SBA lender will make a second position loan and arrange for a non-SBA lender to make the remainder of the loan in a secured first position.
4 includes increased Piggyback Loan functionality, a new loan status bar, added flexibility in reports, more comprehensive truth in lending disclosures and increased marketing functionality, in addition to Title Report and Verification of Employment and Income ordering in Point.
A piggyback loan is a second mortgage "piggybacked" on top of a first to make up for a down payment of less than 20 percent.
Lenders were clearly aware of the piggyback loan problem by the third quarter, when origination volume for securitized closed-end seconds dropped like a rock to $1.
Often times, this loan is taken out as a second or piggyback loan, where the primary loan is used for payment on the home.
In the United States, if a borrower can't or doesn't want to make a 20 percent down payment, he or she generally has two choices: a piggyback loan (taking out a second mortgage to cover the difference between the 80 percent first mortgage and the down payment) or mortgage insurance.
This new 100 percent financing program is an enhancement of the company's popular first- and second-mortgage piggyback loan offer, which was introduced last year.
Figure 3 compares a piggyback loan with an IO loan and a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage (FRM), both with mortgage insurance (MI), showing what would happen to each under a scenario of a two percentage point increase in the prime rate--not unlikely by any historical indicator.