Clocksucker

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Clocksucker

A highly derogatory slang term for an unproductive employee. An equivalent term is pigeon.
References in classic literature ?
He carried the cage of pigeons which we proposed to set free upon the summit.
repeated the Pigeon, but in a more subdued tone, and added with a kind of sob, `I've tried every way, and nothing seems to suit them
Meriones, who had his arrow ready while Teucer was aiming, snatched the bow out of his hand, and at once promised that he would sacrifice a hecatomb of firstling lambs to Apollo lord of the bow; then espying the pigeon high up under the clouds, he hit her in the middle of the wing as she was circling upwards; the arrow went clean through the wing and fixed itself in the ground at Meriones' feet, but the bird perched on the ship's mast hanging her head and with all her feathers drooping; the life went out of her, and she fell heavily from the mast.
Here have I known the pigeon to fly for forty long years, and, till you made your clearings, there was nobody to skeart or to hurt them, I loved to see them come into the woods, for they were company to a body, hurting nothing
turning into black cholers, may carry him off like a pigeon - destined to many years, he is enviable.
The man could not explain how, like a homing pigeon, he had found his way to his own old mess again.
But I am like the pigeon that went away in the fable of the Two Pigeons.
The fatigue was wholesome, and I was so bad a shot that no other creature suffered loss from my gain except one hapless wild pigeon.
On the other hand, it seemed to Van Baerle an auspicious omen that this very cell was assigned to him, for according to his ideas, a jailer ought never to have given to a second pigeon the cage from which the first had so easily flown.
He wrapped the pigeon in green leaves, and, surrounding it with the hot stones from the fire, covered pigeon and stones with earth.
Along the edges of that winding path grew banks of velvet green moss, starred with clusters of pigeon berries.
Peter Winn, SIR: I send you respectfully by express a pigeon worth good money.