LP

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LP

Limited Partnership

A business model in which at least one general partner and at least one limited partner share a business' ownership. In a limited partnership, the general partner does not usually make invest any capital, but has management authority and unlimited liability. That is, the general partner runs the business and, in the event of bankruptcy, is responsible for all debts not paid or discharged. The limited partners have no management authority and confine their participation to their capital investment. That is, limited partners invest a certain amount of money and have nothing else to do with the business. However, their liability is limited to the amount of the investment. In the worst case scenario for a limited partner, he/she loses what he/she invested. Profits are divided between general and limited partners according to an arrangement formed at the creation of the partnership.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thereafter, reports of phonograph concerts appear frequently, but no further discussions appeared on the procedural aspects of handling the recordings themselves, until a commentary by R.
The first spring driven gramophone appeared in 1896 and by the following year its popularity was beginning to overtake the phonograph.
8) In Music & Letters, however, Freeman makes no mention of the use of the phonograph by other FSS members, stating: 'many of the antiquarian collectors of the FSS were far from enthusiastic about its use as a tool for collecting folksong [.
For Solos With a Phonograph in 2001, she walked up to an old phonograph, put on an old 78 record and performed a haunting solo.
In fact, most of his patents and inventions were incremental innovations applied to his phonograph, battery, and electrical circuit devices.
An engaging introduction to the life and work of inventor Thomas Edison, this work invites the young YA to understand and emulate the concepts that preceded the first phonograph and light bulb.
Doak's The Phonograph (0836858-778) and The Telescope And Microscope (0836858808), Sterngass and Kachur's Plastics (0836858786) and Worth's Telegraph And Telephone (0836858794) each tell of life before the invention, the impetus for its development, the inventor's achievement, and its lasting impact on the past, present, and future.
In 1877, Thomas Alva Edison invented the phonograph.
Among the highlights of John Williams's rockin', twirlin', multimedia debut solo show at Dan Bernier in Los Angeles in 1999 were hip versions of the magic lantern: harlequin-patterned combines of variegated gels and supports, placed on old phonograph albums rotating on turntables, projecting flickering patterns of light, like raucous butterflies, across the gallery, with wonky sounds wailing as the needle dropped.
The revolution in the production of music for the individual consumer began with the invention of the phonograph.
It addresses basic reading and language learning skills through topics and themes, such as The Paint Factory, The Dress Show and The Theater; children can click over characters and icons to listen to conversations, sing along with an antique phonograph or read funny stories.
In his book Mimesis and Alterity: A Particular History of the Senses, Michael Taussig identifies the "phonographic mise en scene" as a primal scene in ethnographic film that repeatedly stages the native's awe-struck encounter with "the phonograph in action on the colonial frontier" (199).