Philanthropy

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Philanthropy

The practice of a wealthy individual or corporation giving money to charity or other programs designed to help others. The term is most applicable when the individual or corporation starts his/her/its own programs. For example, Bill Gates established the Gates Foundation to perform a variety of philanthropic activities such as agricultural development and the establishment of libraries.
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Since its inception in 2013, the Delta Community Philanthropic Fund has invested in 45 non-profit organizations that support the physical and financial health of children and adults in metro Atlanta," said Jai Rogers, Delta Community's vice president of business and community development.
ADIB CEO Tirad Al Mahmoud said, "The Middle East region is now an acknowledged centre of global philanthropic efforts.
When asked about the achievements of the forum, Dr Cheema replied: "We have conducted several philanthropic programmes in different parts of the world.
The donation cheque was presented by Batelco Group Chief Executive Shaikh Mohamed bin Isa Al Khalifa to Bahrain Philanthropic Society Board Member Mr.
The philanthropic tradition must be taught and passed from one generation to the next, lest it wither and die.
In addition to his leadership role at the Center, Stuckey is heavily involved in many other philanthropic and community projects.
It opens by surveying the current landscape in philanthropic giving, then examines the major goals of recent philanthropic efforts, including building new schools, supporting troubled districts, promoting school choice and advancing educational research and policy.
Research shows that the following are the four most important for consideration: (1) When the S & P 500 goes up 100 points, it results in approximately $1 billion in giving for philanthropic causes.
The new Little League field is carved out of a piece of sloping ground on property donated by the estate of Robert Walthall, a philanthropic local.
3) Cohen's interpretation locates civil society--defined as "the dense network of voluntary, and especially philanthropic, organizations that mediated between the individual and the state"--not at the periphery but rather at the very center of stability traditionally understood as shaped by states and special interest groups.
Despite its clever co-optation of rhetoric befitting a Sally Struthers infomercial, the dot-com set's spotty philanthropic track record makes them an easy mark.
This, until recently, certainly held true for historians and the relationship between philanthropic foundations and organized labour.