person

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Related to personality: personality test, Personality types

person

Legally, any natural or artificial person, which would include corporations, partnerships, associations, and limited liability companies. If it is important to distinguish among the “persons” who may do something or who are prohibited from doing something, relevant contracts, leases, or statutes will usually define the term.

References in classic literature ?
My other-personality is almost equal in power with my own personality.
They think it is their own personality, that they have only one personality; and from such a premise they can conclude only that they have lived previous lives.
The note of the perfect personality is not rebellion, but peace.
It will be a marvellous thing - the true personality of man - when we see it.
He pointed out that the material needs of Man were great and very permanent, but that the spiritual needs of Man were greater still, and that in one divine moment, and by selecting its own mode of expression, a personality might make itself perfect.
He would allow no claim whatsoever to be made on personality.
In fine, a healthy work of art is one that has both perfection and personality.
As long as I live, the personality of Dorian Gray will dominate me.
This was decisive; for no obscure premonition, and of something indefinite at that, could stand against the example of his tranquil personality.
He had an affection for the aged disciple of Michaelis, a complex sentiment depending a little on her prestige, on her personality, but most of all on the instinct of flattered gratitude.
The distaste, the absence of glamour, extend from the occupation to the personality.
And there would be also some scandalised concern for his art too, since a man must identify himself with something more tangible than his own personality, and establish his pride somewhere, either in his social position, or in the quality of the work he is obliged to do, or simply in the superiority of the idleness he may be fortunate enough to enjoy.