person

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Related to personal pronoun: possessive pronoun, demonstrative pronoun

person

Legally, any natural or artificial person, which would include corporations, partnerships, associations, and limited liability companies. If it is important to distinguish among the “persons” who may do something or who are prohibited from doing something, relevant contracts, leases, or statutes will usually define the term.

References in periodicals archive ?
As regards the personal pronoun under discussion its distribution in the late 15th century prose presented the following pattern:
Kinship terms and personal pronouns do not convey marked attitudinal meanings if they are used according to the speakers' family and social roles and level of deference determined by their relationships.
3, the peculiar use of the personal pronoun "you" in the shorter version has a remarkable effect in making readers aware of the narrative frame.
The least inflection Elnora uses when speaking of Miss Jenny is rendered by the capitalization of the personal pronouns, an attribute of royalty, or deity.
The style is highly personal, frequently resembling that of the diary in its use of the personal pronoun, and the examples far outnumber the arguments.
Act I will be assumed to be an occurrence of the personal pronoun I.
Wider languages education research literature also addresses 'cultural dimensions' of personal pronoun use across languages.
gt;nat (nominative, accusative) / of personal pronoun
The personal pronoun is appropriate in this context, because if it were not for my filibusters, it is entirely likely my home would have been transformed long ago into a haven for the History Channel, Animal Planet and Fox News.
The Northern-Samoyedic use of the indefinite conjugation in the case of the 3P personal pronoun is an exception from this tendency (see also Helimskij 1982 : 84-85).
The appearance of e is the norm between a liquid (here l) as third root consonant and a non-liquid (here f) as suffix personal pronoun.
The readable writing and the simple personal pronoun shows she is a no-nonsense person who likes to feel people are putting energy and commitment into what they are doing.

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