person

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person

Legally, any natural or artificial person, which would include corporations, partnerships, associations, and limited liability companies. If it is important to distinguish among the “persons” who may do something or who are prohibited from doing something, relevant contracts, leases, or statutes will usually define the term.

References in classic literature ?
The being of God in a personal or impersonal form was a mental necessity to the first thinkers of modern times: from this alone all other ideas could be deduced.
The system of Spinoza is less personal and also less dualistic than that of Descartes.
We by no means intend to abolish this personal appropriation of the products of labour, an appropriation that is made for the maintenance and reproduction of human life, and that leaves no surplus wherewith to command the labour of others.
He now discovered that he might play his own Odwar into personal combat with Gahan; but he had already lost one Odwar and could ill spare the other.
Fashion understands itself; good-breeding and personal superiority of whatever country readily fraternize with those of every other.
Therefore besides personal force and so much perception as constitutes unerring taste, society demands in its patrician class another element already intimated, which it significantly terms good-nature,--expressing all degrees of generosity, from the lowest willingness and faculty to oblige, up to the heights of magnanimity and love.
Questions of identity, where instances of personal resemblance are concerned, are, in themselves, the hardest of all questions to settle--the hardest, even when they are free from the complications which beset the case we are now discussing.
You have, no doubt, a personal motive for proceeding, into which it is not my business to inquire.
You are right in assuming that I have personal motives for stirring in this matter.
He squandered too much in the heat of personal communication.
When the sovereign happened to be a man of vigorous and warlike temper and of superior abilities, he would acquire a personal weight and influence, which answered, for the time, the purpose of a more regular authority.
As it was, he impressed himself professionally on Europe to an extent that made his comparative personal obscurity, and the failure of Oxford to do justice to his eminence, a puzzle to foreign specialists in his subject.