perishability


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perishability

  1. a characteristic of SERVICES, namely that the capacity of a service business, such as a hotel room, is perishable – if it is not occupied, that is lost income which cannot be recovered.
  2. goods such as food which deteriorate over time and thus have a relatively short SHELF LIFE.
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Perishability and obsolescence make deployment of cyber weapons unlike that of other weapons in the US arsenal.
More importantly, there are doubts whether online grocery will succeed at all, especially since physical delivery of low-value goods will always run up against the constraints of infrastructure, labour and perishability.
Even the best have serious drawbacks with perishability and bioavailability.
This is because of the glut in pepper outputs for sale and the desire of the farmers to dispose of their produce at the same time in order to avoid loss due to perishability or loss in transit.
According to the theory presented by Charlton and Fantino (2008), this difference would be explained by one of the following three characteristic differences: perishability, satiability, and metabolic function.
The hands-on buying nature and perishability of these goods limits the usefulness and practicality of buying online," said Ashraf.
In May this year, Tanzania's Deputy Minister for Food, Agriculture and Cooperatives, Godfrey Zambi, announced plans to set up a processing factory in Chamwino, which would counter the challenges farmers face due to the perishability of the crop.
A sense of real-time perishability linksed these otherwise distinctive lexicons, a perishability that widely evoked marine debris, breached organs, leakage, contamination and combustion.
Between their perishability and slightly mysterious identity it is easy to understand how they could be overlooked or rejected in favor of other cuts of meat.
Contemporary and historic media are mixed and combined in this instillation evoking reflection on past and present, on the laws of mankind in comparison to the never changing landscape, reminding us of the human smallness and perishability.
One mystery remains though: why did not Locke see that even if his perishability constraint would not be transgressed in this scenario, his 'enough and as good' probably would?
Much of Yes vocabulary was already present in Cruisin': scent, perishability, corporeality, seepage, and transparency--all plopped together with youthful aplomb, void of any anxiety about art-historical lineage.