Peon

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Related to peonage: Debt peonage

Peon

An unskilled worker. The term has a highly negative connotation.
References in periodicals archive ?
the issues of fair hiring practices, southern peonage, and intraracial
In the second chapter of Fears and Fascinations, Haddox analyzes the medievalism that Southerners claimed as a justification first for slavery and then for peonage and discrimination.
However, Southern farms continued to make use of peonage and sharecropping as a direct result of the federal governments' failure to convert plantations to homesteads for freed slaves.
There was also considerable labour migration across this particular borderland, with slaves fleeing south to Mexico and hacienda servants moving north to escape debt peonage.
The Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (15) defines "severe forms of trafficking in persons" as "the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining a person for labor or services through the use of force, fraud, or coercion for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery.
The convict lease formed a central strand in the web of racist labor coercions and the return of Democratic rule in Texas, a web that included debt peonage, tenant farming and sharecropping, anchored by highly restrictive labor contracts.
The Court has held peonage laws to be unconstitutional under the Thirteenth Amendment.
Schmidt claimed, for example, that the Supreme Court's peonage decisions, which invalidated statutes forcing persons who breached employment contracts to become indentured servants, (67) effectively dismantled southern peonage and became "the most lasting of the White Court's contributions to justice for black people, and among its greatest achievements.
But political relations are not family relations writ large--not, that is, unless we want to return to the age of peonage and serfdom.
Similarly, for the Mexican rancho period, we start with Hubert Howe Bancroft's vision of rancho life as "lotus-land" and complicate it with the experiences of California Indians working under the system of debt peonage.
Emigrant agent laws restricted blacks' opportunities indirectly, but a far more direct restriction came from debt peonage--a term likely to mislead, as many cases of peonage were only distantly related to debt, if at all.