pay


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Payment

The reception of compensation for a good or service. For example, if one sells a hairdryer for $10, the payment is $10. In a cash sale, payment is made immediately or almost immediately, while in a credit sale, payment may be delayed for a certain period of time.

pay

the money paid to an employee for performing specified work tasks or JOBS. Payment to employees for the labour they provide takes two main forms:
  1. PAYMENT BY TIME, principally weekly WAGES and OVERTIME, together with monthly SALARIES;
  2. PAYMENT BY RESULTS, principally PIECEWORK, INCENTIVE BONUSES, GROUP INCENTIVE BONUSES.

The main distinction between the two is that ‘payment by time’ systems remunerate workers for the amount of labour supplied (i.e. the input of labour) per time period (hourly, weekly etc.) irrespective of the amount of output produced; whereas ‘payment by results’ systems remunerate workers specifically for the amount or value of the output produced in a given time period. ‘Payment by results’ is favoured by many firms because it is thought to provide a strong financial incentive for workers to strive to maximize their output rather than work at a more leisurely pace, but the firm may be required to install appropriate INSPECTION systems to ensure that extra output has not been achieved at the expense of product quality and reliability.

Pay rates are determined by a number of factors including the forces of supply and demand for particular types of job in the LABOUR MARKET, the bargaining power of TRADE UNIONS (see COLLECTIVE BARGAINING) and the general economic climate (see, for example, PRICES AND INCOMES POLICY). In addition to receipt of money employees may receive various other work-related benefits such as free or subsidized meals, travel allowances, a company car, etc. (see FRINGE BENEFITS). See ATTENDANCE BONUS, MERIT PAY, COMMISSION, FEE, PERFORMANCE-RELATED PAY, CAFETERIA BENEFITS, COMPARABILITY, INCREMENTAL PAY SCALE, WORK MEASUREMENT, PROFIT-RELATED PAY, EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP PLAN, PAY DIFFERENTIALS, LOW PAY, GAINSHARING, EXECUTIVE SHARE OPTION SCHEME, LONG-TERM INCENTIVE PLAN, SHARE INCENTIVE PLAN, MINIMUM WAGE RATE, FINANCIAL PARTICIPATION.

pay

the money paid to an employee for performing specified work tasks or jobs. Payment to employees for the labour they provide takes two main forms:
  1. payment by time, principally weekly WAGES and OVERTIME, together with monthly SALARIES.
  2. payment by results, principally PIECEWORK payments, bonuses (see BONUS SCHEME), PROFIT-RELATED PAY and COMMISSIONS.

The main distinction between the two is that ‘payment by time’ systems remunerate workers for the amount of labour supplied (i.e. the input of labour) per time period (hourly, weekly, etc.), irrespective of the amount of output produced, whereas ‘payment by results’ systems remunerate workers specifically for the amount or value of the output produced in a given time period. ‘Payment by results’ is favoured by many firms because it is thought to provide a strong financial incentive for workers to strive to maximize their output rather than work at a more leisurely pace, but the firm may be required to install appropriate inspection systems to ensure that extra output has not been achieved at the expense of product quality and reliability.

Pay rates are determined by a number of factors, including the forces of supply and demand for particular types of job in the LABOUR MARKET (see WAGE RATE), the bargaining power of TRADE UNIONS (see COLLECTIVE BARGAINING) and the general economic climate (see, for example, PRICES AND INCOMES POLICY).

In addition to receipt of money, employees may receive various other work-related benefits such as free or subsidized meals, travel allowances, a company car, etc. See FRINGE BENEFITS, DEFERRED COMPENSATION. See EMPLOYEE SHARE OWNERSHIP, PROFIT SHARING.

References in classic literature ?
The master that's to pay him the money is the one that's rightly concerned in that matter, ye will notice "
A month or two later I was able to understand why a courier did not have to pay any board and lodging, and why my hotel bills were always larger when I had him with me than when I left him behind, somewhere, for a few days.
An six hundred crowns,'' said Isaac, ``the good Prior might well pay to your honoured valours, and never sit less soft in his stall.
The farmer followed him with his eyes, and when he saw that he had cleared the wood and was no longer in sight, he turned to his boy Andres, and said, "Come here, my son, I want to pay you what I owe you, as that undoer of wrongs has commanded me.
Come along," said Caderousse; "but you pay the score.
I never have a thousand livres to pay," replied D'Artagnan.
Either pay thy debt as I have said, or release thy land and get thee gone from out my hall.
I wanted very much to go where I might secure work that would at least pay me enough to purchase some much-needed clothing and other necessities.
If the place belongs to the members, why do they have to pay thirty pounds?
It's better pay than you ever got in your life before.
I shall pay you for the price of the wife, of the two wives.
Then she drank to prosperity in his undertakings, and he drank to the hope that James Grant would show up and pay her for his washing.