Pauper

(redirected from pauperism)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Pauper

A very poor person, especially one reliant on government benefits or charity. A pauper may be able to file a lawsuit without paying filing fees.
References in periodicals archive ?
55) The Jukes were a New York family that was the subject of Robert Dugdale's 1877 book The Jukes: A Study in Crime, Pauperism, Disease, and Heredity.
ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE, MEMOIR ON PAUPERISM (SEYMOUR DRESCHER TRANS.
Rather than representing a "laissez-faire" market where "independent factors" unite on the basis of mutual love and respect, marriage manifests paternalistic dependence, pauperism, and over-legislation.
Were such manners to prevail, the horrors of pauperism would accumulate.
There are several courts, alleys and lanes behind the principal streets occupied by families bordering on pauperism, and a similar class of people is found even in the new streets, such as Charlotte Street, Caroline Street, and Irish Town and near the Canal.
43) Since the whole volume contrasts the loud pageantry of the aristocracy (even in wartime) and the sullen pauperism of common people: I propose that the "River Song" is focused on these extremes (this issue will be settled in the next section).
Reported Claghorn: "There was little pauperism among these people, if we may judge from the relative infrequency of Italian cases appearing in the reports of private charitable societies.
Although the poorhouse's goal was to reform character and "repress pauperism," its overall effects resulted in poor people's exploitation of the institutions as well as the staff and officials of the houses.
danger of pauperism, danger to health, danger to morals, danger to property, danger to public principles by revolutions or change of government, or danger to religion.
Examples of the deviations from accepted standards of 'normal' society listed by the Milford Conference were alcoholism, crime, delinquency, illiteracy, pauperism.
in the tenements all the influences make for evil; because they are the hotbeds of the epidemics that carry death to rich and poor alike; the nurseries of pauperism and crime that fill our jails and police courts; that throw off a scum of forty thousand human wrecks to the island asylums and workhouses year by year; that turned out in the last eight years a round half million beggars to prey upon our charities; that maintain a standing army of ten thousand tramps with all that that implies; because, above all, they touch the family life with deadly moral contagion.