Patent Office

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Patent Office

a UK body which is responsible for the administration of various aspects of ‘intellectual property rights’ legislation, in particular the COPYRIGHT, DESIGNS AND PATENTS ACTS 1988, the Registered Designs Act 1949 and the Trade Marks Act 1938. The Patent Office is the sole authority for the granting of PATENT rights on product and process inventions and for the registration of industrial designs (see DESIGN RIGHTS) and TRADEMARKS.

Patent Office

a UK government department that administer matters relating to PATENTS, TRADEMARKS and other INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS. The Patent

Office is the sole authority for the granting of patent rights on product and process INVENTIONS and for the registration of industrial designs and trademarks.

References in periodicals archive ?
Materials on the history of Japan's patent system distributed by the Patent Office describe pro patent policy as "an effort to stimulate industry and strengthen the ability to compete internationally by protecting inventors' rights and enhancing incentives to invent through the provision of stronger intellectual property protections.
Scholars say Japan has top-class legislation regarding intellectual property, and, at 439,175 filings in 2001, Japan's Patent Office fielded the largest number of patent applications of any patent office in the world.
Am English-language publication on the contribution of patent rights to Japan's industrial development, distributed by the Patent Office, summarizes the expo's significance: "It was extremely successful compared with other events of the time, but because a legal system for patents was not sufficiently established, the exhibition actually served to increase counterfeits.
Some of the recommendations today address the need to rapidly increase the technical expertise of IP professionals, including examiners, patent attorneys and judges in patent disputes, while there are some 40-50 specialists that are called in regularly to brief patent examiners on new developments in biotechnology and other fields, the fast pace of discovery in both the life sciences and IT has put significant pressure on the Patent Office to keep up.
Under Japan's original patent law, according to another Patent Office publication, inventions "contrary to public order or relating to medicines and drugs" could nut be patented.
Patent Office recently notified Benitec that as a result of the request for re-examination filed by Nucleonics, the USPTO has determined a re-examination of each and every claim of Benitec's U.
Opposition proceedings were initiated in the European Patent Office (EPO) against the patent in December 1998.
In Japan, the Japanese Patent Office has upheld Japanese Patent Number 2,938,573 entitled "Demodulation Element Assignment in a System Capable of Receiving Multiple Signals," in a slightly amended form.