Passive

(redirected from passive diffusion)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to passive diffusion: passive transport

Passive

Income or loss from business activities in which a person does not materially participate, such as a limited partnership.

Passive

Income (or loss) from an investment in which an individual does not directly participate. The most common types of passive income are rents from property one owns and income from a limited partnership. Some analysts consider income from dividends and coupons to be passive income while others do not. Passive income is taxable, but it is often treated differently from active income.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many thanks to Erik Andresen, Nina Dahl and colleagues at the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU) for the preparation and analysis of passive diffusion gas samplers.
Reliability of nitrogen dioxide passive diffusion tubes for ambient measurement: in situ properties of the triethanolamine absorbent, Journal of Environmental Monitoring 2: 307-312.
In view of the observed pH--solubility profile, for a 50% v/v propylene glycol:water vehicle, a pH between 4 and 5 was suggested by the authors to provide the most favourable environment for passive diffusion since the concentration of unionised methotrexate would be optimal.
Passive diffusion of SA through cellulose acetate membrane was compared with iontophoretic diffusion by various current profiles.
We may only speculate that oral thyroxine is administered as sodium salt that is less lipophilic than the native hormone, which enters target cells both through passive diffusion and in a carrier-mediated, inhibitable way.
Specifically, the objectives of this study were to evaluate: 1) the limiting nutrient of periphytic algae using a passive diffusion periphytometer; 2) the content of easily exchangeable nutrients in sediments; and 3) sediment and water column dissolved P equilibrium in these streams.
Gas exchange is accomplished through the process of passive diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide across the alveolar-capillary membrane.
The authors outline the mechanisms whereby secretion, active pumping, passive diffusion or gradient diffusion at the cellular level cause nucleation on particulates, on cell surfaces, or genetically programmed precipitation in organic matrices either on or within cells.
Molecules traverse the membranes either by passive diffusion or active transport.
For example, a passive diffusion periphytometer is used to assess algal nutrient limitation and assimilation capacity in streams; this technology may be used to develop nutrient management thresholds for streams based on comprehensive measures of nutrient assimilative capacity.

Full browser ?