Pass On

(redirected from pass)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Pass On

To charge a customer for an expense that one was required to pay. For example, suppose a company spends $10 for a product, which it then re-sells to customers for $14. If the company's supplier raises the price to $12 per product, the company may pass on the expenses to customers by raising its own price to $16 per product, thereby preserving its $4 profit.
References in classic literature ?
And at last we saw before us the Pass opening out on the eastern side.
Then the officer began to pass in review all the people, one after the other, and stopping when he came to Milady, surveyed her very closely, but without addressing a single word to her.
When, after what seemed an eternity, I reached the shadows at the upper end of the lake I found that the river issued from a low aperture, to pass beneath which it was necessary that I compel Woola to lie flat in the boat, and I, myself, must need bend double before the low roof cleared my head.
Seeing them pass, Prince Vasili drew back with obvious impatience, while the princess jumped up and with a gesture of desperation slammed the door with all her might.
Some time later we had removed the skins from the four Mahars, and so succeeded in crawling inside of them ourselves that there seemed an excellent chance for us to pass unnoticed from Phutra.
The hills pass in stately procession, their bosoms rising and falling; the trees move in restless circles; the little grasses describe their little arcs; and all is movement, restless, mysterious movement without sound, while Thuria passes.
The car was forced to stop here to let a cavalcade of ammunition waggons pass by.
And they would continue to take program from him, as they had always taken it, or else they would swiftly and suddenly pass.
When, finally, Alvan Creede had seen the last person of the line pass into that awful tumult the light that had illuminated it was suddenly quenched and all was as black to him as to those within.
Jean Pied-du-Port, and by six Sir Nigel's Company, three hundred strong, were on their way for the defile, pushing swiftly in the dim light up the steep curving road; for it was the prince's order that they should be the first to pass through, and that they should remain on guard at the further end until the whole army had emerged from the mountains.
This is one of the times I KNOW I'm not going to pass.
She let the question pass, without a sign to show that she had heard him.