Partisan


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Partisan

Describing any measure or policy that draws support from only one political party. For example, in the United States, a bill drawing support only from Democrats or only from Republicans may be said to be partisan. The term can also be used to describe to the act of rigidly supporting only the interests of one's own party.
References in classic literature ?
This partisan appeared at the rendezvous without his party, and a sorrowful tale of disasters had he to relate.
Before partisan warfare had been officially recognized by the government, thousands of enemy stragglers, marauders, and foragers had been destroyed by the Cossacks and the peasants, who killed them off as instinctively as dogs worry a stray mad dog to death.
Thus refreshed and sobered, the jolly priest twirled his heavy partisan round his head with three fingers, as if he had been balancing a reed, exclaiming at the same time, ``Where be those false ravishers, who carry off wenches against their will?
The growing indignation was voiced from time to time in published protests, of which the last, in 1698, was the over-zealous but powerful 'Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage' by Jeremy Collier, which carried the more weight because the author was not a Puritan but a High-Church bishop and partisan of the Stuarts.
Almost all these gentlemen were in heart partisans of the Emperor, and had their opinions about the speedy end of the campaign.
I know that the Dahcotahs are a wise and great people," at length the trapper commenced, again addressing himself to the chief; "but does not their partisan know a single brother who is base?
Napoleon, in the Island of Elba, is too near France, and his proximity keeps up the hopes of his partisans.
Thus it happens that whenever those who are hostile have the opportunity to attack they do it like partisans, whilst the others defend lukewarmly, in such wise that the prince is endangered along with them.
Stay, yonder she is, where you see a group of partisans.
It does not become us, perhaps,' pursued the Dean, 'to be partisans.
They have decried all free government as inconsistent with the order of society, and have indulged themselves in malicious exultation over its friends and partisans.
Behind him, pale indeed, but marching with a firm step, was Charles Stuart, who advanced between two priests, followed by a few superior officers appointed to preside at the execution and attended by two files of partisans who took their places on opposite sides of the scaffold.