parties


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parties

In litigation, the various people or companies with grievances or defenses that wish to be heard by the court. Types of parties include

• Plaintiff. Files the lawsuit.
• Defendant. The person the suit is against.
• Counterplaintiff. A defendant who has claims against the plaintiff.
• Counterdefendant. The plaintiff who is also sued by the defendant.
• Cross-claimants. Defendants who sue each other.
• Third-party defendants. When a defendant decides someone else should be added to the lawsuit because the defendant has claims against that person and it is all related to the same dispute. (Typically occurs when the defendant seeks indemnity from another.)

References in periodicals archive ?
He said that as many as 31 political parties out of 345 have submitted their statements of bank accounts for financial year 2016-17 with the ECP within due time.
Electoral symbols would not be allotted to the political parties which failed to submit their asset details to the ECP.
18 [section] 5704 (one party consent for the police; all parties consent otherwise);
For one thing, parties that issue subpoenas must always be conscious of their obligation under Rule 45 to "take reasonable steps to avoid imposing undue burden or expense on a person subject to that subpoena.
Specify the issues that the parties have agreed to arbitrate;
Majcher's company, The Party Goddess, has been hired to plan more than a dozen company parties this holiday season.
The CPA's analysis, opinions and related correspondence should always be sent to both parties and their counsel, and both attorneys should have their client's authority to request services.
Every week in economically disadvantaged neighborhoods, such as East New York, Crown Heights, and Spanish Harlem, promoters throw for-profit sex parties like this one, where condom use is left up to the participants.
Establish a policy of mailing payment only to the original owner of the funds, thereby leaving third parties to make their own collections.
Although Harrison never held elective office, his posture and his example inspired many African Americans in New York to seek achievement and make contributions in political parties.
Some of America's Founders viewed political parties as a serious threat.
Since the law was not suspended during the court proceedings, candidates, parties and political groups have operated under the new rules for more than a year, and the initial impact of the law is becoming clear.