parties


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parties

In litigation, the various people or companies with grievances or defenses that wish to be heard by the court. Types of parties include

• Plaintiff. Files the lawsuit.
• Defendant. The person the suit is against.
• Counterplaintiff. A defendant who has claims against the plaintiff.
• Counterdefendant. The plaintiff who is also sued by the defendant.
• Cross-claimants. Defendants who sue each other.
• Third-party defendants. When a defendant decides someone else should be added to the lawsuit because the defendant has claims against that person and it is all related to the same dispute. (Typically occurs when the defendant seeks indemnity from another.)

References in periodicals archive ?
For another thing, parties that issue subpoenas should be aware that courts are much more willing to shift the costs of production from the responding party to the requesting party in cases where the requesting party has not sufficiently protected the producing party from "undue burden or expense.
Prohibit ex parte contacts between the arbitrator and the parties.
And, as every employee who's ever gone to a company event can tell you, not all parties are created equal.
Dueling accountants usually present two different sets of numbers, creating a range within which the parties are likely to settle.
The Raw Dukes affair may have been the first time key activists had heard of a sex party catering to men of color where condoms were officially banned, but most for-profit sex parties openly allow unsafe sex.
The first parties developed in the late 1700s, when George Washington was President.
State parties must use federally regulated funds to pay for all federal election activities, including voter registration and turnout efforts that feature federal candidates and broadcast ads that "promote, support, attack, or oppose" a federal candidate.
One of the major causes of past-due receivables is that the facility has not defined clearly to its residents/responsible parties and business-office staff when the accounts are to be paid.
The issue of how America's two main political parties have dealt with race is still a potent one, as Republican Senator Trent Lott of Mississippi discovered.
There are often negotiations between both parties as to the timing of the apology, the specificity of the offence, the nature of the explanation, the degree of remorse and the amount of reparations.
Kelleher had some fierce disputes with people when he switched parties, but his friends knew he was something of a maverick.