participation rate


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Participation Rate

The number of persons in an economy who are willing to work, and are either working or looking for work as a percentage of the total labor force. The participation rate is one way to measure an economy's employment rate. See also: Discouraged worker.

participation rate

see ACTIVITY RATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the government shortened curfew hours during the elections to begin at 11 pm instead of 7 pm and end at 6 am, participation rates remained low in the Rafah and Sheikh Zuweid districts.
Using the June 2009 participation rate for today's young adult workers, ages 20-24, we'd need to admit that an extra half million of them are also missing from our economy," continued Ortiz.
For example, for the group aged 15-65 the participation rate is 75 percent for university degree holders in Mexico and 59 for high school degree holders, while it is 72 and 37 percent, respectively, in Turkey.
The lowest registered participation rate reached its lowest level since February 1978 (62.
To an important extent, this decline in the labor force participation rate likely reflects the ongoing influence of the aging of the population, which was one focus of a Brookings paper written nearly a decade ago by several of the present authors (Aaronson and others 2006).
As we have different numbers of people in these different demographic groups, we should naturally expect the aggregate labor force participation rate to change.
The participation rate for foreign-born women is still significantly lower than for Swedish-born women, however.
So the aging of the baby boomer generation lowers the overall average participation rate.
Some has to do with demographics as more of the working age population ages into groups with lower participation rates, but participation seems to be lower among most age groups (although participation among those with higher levels of educational attainment seems to have held up best).
During the four-year time period from 2009 to 2012, what is the labor force participation rate among all working-age (16 to 64 years of age) people in the U.
The model indicates that today's labor force participation rate of 63.
Contrary to expectations, the aggregate labour force participation rate has risen, not fallen.