Parking

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Parking

Putting money into safe investments such as money market investments while deciding where to invest the money.

Parking

1. The act or practice of investing in low risk and/or highly liquid securities while one decides where to invest in the medium and long term. For example, one may park one's money in a Treasury bond, or even a savings account, while one makes these decisions.

2. The act of illegally holding or financing stock on behalf of another party with the intent to conceal that party's ownership. Parking occurs when an investor would otherwise own more that 5% of shares outstanding, which would require him/her to register certain information with the SEC. Parking is a method a corporate raider uses when he/she wishes to conceal his/her intent to acquire a company. The raider therefore enlists another's help in doing so by asking him/her to hold or finance a certain amount of stock. See also: Williams Act.

parking

1. Placing idle funds in a safe, short-term investment while awaiting the availability of other investment opportunities. Many investors end up parking proceeds from a security sale in a money market account while searching for other securities to purchase.
2. Transferring stock positions to another party so that true ownership of the stock will be hidden. For example, an investor involved in the takeover of a company may park securities of the company with other investors so that the management of the target company will not know the extent of the investor's stock ownership. Parking for this purpose is generally illegal.
References in classic literature ?
Northward were Kilburn and Hampsted, blue and crowded with houses; westward the great city was dimmed; and southward, beyond the Martians, the green waves of Regent's Park, the Langham Hotel, the dome of the Albert Hall, the Imperial Institute, and the giant mansions of the Brompton Road came out clear and little in the sunrise, the jagged ruins of Westminster rising hazily beyond.
Then the priest, a shorter figure in the background, said mildly: "I understood that Mr Boulnois was not coming to Pendragon Park this evening.
But John Boulnois changed his mind; John Boulnois left his home abruptly and all alone, and came over to this darned Park an hour or so ago.
That American reporter told me he had been to your house, and your butler told him Mr Boulnois had gone to Pendragon Park after all.
If that was the case, why should she be anxious to have her visit at Blackwater Park kept a secret from him?
I wish my first day at Blackwater Park had not been associated with death, though it is only the death of a stray animal.
In violent and extraordinary contrast with this scene of destruction, close at hand were the huge newspaper establishments of Park Row.
Everywhere, too, were flagstaffs devoid of flags; one white sheet drooped and flapped and drooped again over the Park Row buildings.
Then down they had come at last to hover over City Hall Park, and it had crept in upon his mind,, chillingly, terrifyingly, that these illuminated black masses were great offices afire, and that the going to and fro of minute, dim spectres of lantern-lit grey and white was a harvesting of the wounded and the dead.
But when Amelia came down with her kind smiling looks (Rebecca must introduce her to her friend, Miss Crawley was longing to see her, and was too ill to leave her carriage)--when, I say, Amelia came down, the Park Lane shoulder-knot aristocracy wondered more and more that such a thing could come out of Bloomsbury; and Miss Crawley was fairly captivated by the sweet blushing face of the young lady who came forward so timidly and so gracefully to pay her respects to the protector of her friend.
It was arranged that Amelia was to spend the morning with the ladies of Park Lane, where all were very kind to her.
The great family coach of the Osbornes transported him to Park Lane from Russell Square; where the young ladies, who were not themselves invited, and professed the greatest indifference at that slight, nevertheless looked at Sir Pitt Crawley's name in the baronetage; and learned everything which that work had to teach about the Crawley family and their pedigree, and the Binkies, their relatives,