Parking

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Parking

Putting money into safe investments such as money market investments while deciding where to invest the money.

Parking

1. The act or practice of investing in low risk and/or highly liquid securities while one decides where to invest in the medium and long term. For example, one may park one's money in a Treasury bond, or even a savings account, while one makes these decisions.

2. The act of illegally holding or financing stock on behalf of another party with the intent to conceal that party's ownership. Parking occurs when an investor would otherwise own more that 5% of shares outstanding, which would require him/her to register certain information with the SEC. Parking is a method a corporate raider uses when he/she wishes to conceal his/her intent to acquire a company. The raider therefore enlists another's help in doing so by asking him/her to hold or finance a certain amount of stock. See also: Williams Act.

parking

1. Placing idle funds in a safe, short-term investment while awaiting the availability of other investment opportunities. Many investors end up parking proceeds from a security sale in a money market account while searching for other securities to purchase.
2. Transferring stock positions to another party so that true ownership of the stock will be hidden. For example, an investor involved in the takeover of a company may park securities of the company with other investors so that the management of the target company will not know the extent of the investor's stock ownership. Parking for this purpose is generally illegal.
References in classic literature ?
But before the dawn my courage returned, and while the stars were still in the sky I turned once more towards Regent's Park.
Northward were Kilburn and Hampsted, blue and crowded with houses; westward the great city was dimmed; and southward, beyond the Martians, the green waves of Regent's Park, the Langham Hotel, the dome of the Albert Hall, the Imperial Institute, and the giant mansions of the Brompton Road came out clear and little in the sunrise, the jagged ruins of Westminster rising hazily beyond.
Neighbors, always invited to Prior's Park on such occasions, went back to their own houses in motors or on foot; the legal and archeoological gentleman had returned to the Inns of Court by a late train, to get a paper called for during his consultation with his client; and most of the other guests were drifting and lingering at various stages on their way up to bed.
But from the top of the house to the bottom, from the walls round the park to the pond in the center, there was no trace of Lord Bulmer, dead or alive.
And turning the corner by the open lodge-gates, he set off, stumping up the long avenue of black pine-woods that pointed in abrupt perspective towards the inner gardens of Pendragon Park.
Everywhere, too, were flagstaffs devoid of flags; one white sheet drooped and flapped and drooped again over the Park Row buildings.
I can't tell you all about it now, for there's Matilda, I see, in the park, and I must go and open my budget to her.
They saw it as they walked up the pine-fringed hill from the park.
His fare entered, and the cab whirled into the cool fastnesses of the park along the shortest homeward cuts.
Crawley sent over a choice parcel of tracts, to prepare her for the change from Vanity Fair and Park Lane for another world; but a good doctor from Southampton being called in in time, vanquished the lobster which was so nearly fatal to her, and gave her sufficient strength to enable her to return to London.
Meanwhile, here I am, established at Blackwater Park, "the ancient and interesting seat" (as the county history obligingly informs me) "of Sir Percival Glyde, Bart.
Among the other forlorn wanderers in the Parks, there appeared latterly a trim little figure in black (with the face protected from notice behind a crape veil), which was beginning to be familiar, day after day, to nursemaids and children, and to rouse curiosity among harmless solitaries meditating on benches, and idle vagabonds strolling over the grass.